Archive

Posts Tagged ‘vSphere’

Libvirt vs vSphere Management Agent: A Quick Comparison

July 10th, 2013 No comments

Libvirt is an open source project for managing almost all hypervisors and containers. It’s implemented in C and can be exposed through different language bindings.

There are both server (a.k.a daemon or agent) and client. If you are familiar with VMware vSphere (I assume you are if you read my blog), the server is very much like the hostd running on the ESXi side. The client is like the VI Java API that can be used for remote management.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

How to Avoid “127.0.0.1” in SNMP Trap With vCenter Server Virtual Appliance

April 24th, 2013 1 comment

SNMP trap provides a very useful way to monitor vSphere. You can use either GUI or vSphere API to configure up to 4 trap receivers. With that I can use alarm to monitor events or state changes.

If you use vSphere API to add SNMP receivers, you will need the OptionManager managed object. The related options you want to set are: snmp.receiver.1.name, snmp.receiver.1.port, snmp.receiver.1.community, snmp.receiver.1.enabled. There are 3 more sets with similar names but different numbers (2, 3, 4).

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

A Quick Hack to Database Failure in vCenter Appliance

April 14th, 2013 2 comments

After playing with the vCenter appliance simulator feature documented by William, I got into a show stopper that vCenter service (VPXD) could not be started. I don’t think it’s related to the simulator feature at all. My guess is that it’s caused by a sudden power off of the virtual machine but didn’t try to reproduce the problem that way – I care more to fix it than anything else.

vSphere vs. Hyper-V: Difference of Virtual Machine States

January 6th, 2013 7 comments

While reading articles about Microsoft Hyper-V, I found that Hyper-V seemed to have different states for virtual machines from VMware vSphere. The virtual machine in Hyper-V is represented by the Msvm_ComputerSystem class. If you are familiar with VMware vSphere, you know the equivalent in vSphere is VirtualMachine. At first sight, the Hyper-V APIs may not look straight-forward. The Hyper-V APIs is actually based on Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), which is essentially CIM from DMTF.

Cisco Nexus 1000V Distributed Virtual Switch: Command Line Examples

January 3rd, 2013 10 comments

I just took three day Cisco Nexus 1000V training before Christmas. It’s a pretty good experience to play with the commands in the VSM appliance although I am still not quite familiar with these commands yet. Nevertheless, I managed to run through all the 9 labs thanks to the online lab that I could access even after class. To help myself to remember what I did, I listed a few commands that often needed in managing Nexus 1000V.

DoubleCloud VM Connector for Remote Desktop Connection Manager in VMware Environment

December 2nd, 2012 7 comments

In my previous article, I introduced the Remote Desktop Connection Manager. It’s highly recommended to use it over the virtual machine console which all goes through the ESXi management IP therefore is not good for performance especially when there are many concurrent connections to virtual machines running on a same physical host.

Even if you are convinced on connecting to virtual machines directly, you will find it’s not convenient to add many virtual machines to the Remote Desktop Connection Manager. That is why I decided to write a small tool to automate it.

Conceptual Deep Dive in VMware vCenter Single Sign On

November 4th, 2012 3 comments

One of the key new features in vSphere 5.1 is the Single Sign On. Because it’s new and also complicated, I’ve heard it’s not easy to get it right the first time. Experts recommend that you should play with it in a test or staging environment before upgrading your production environment.

Why Web is Not Good as Primary GUI for vSphere

October 9th, 2012 11 comments

I recently started to use the new Flex based vSphere Web Client while working on the open source vijava to support vSphere 5.1. Overall I like the look and feel, and particularly the extensibility story around the new architecture. However, I am not impressed by the performance – I saw way more “loading…” and clock cursor than I expected. Technically, I don’t think that is the direction VMware wants to bet on as the primary user interface for its flagship product vSphere.

VMware Serengeti: A Perfect Match of Hadoop and vSphere

July 19th, 2012 No comments

During the Hadoop Summit 2012 last month, I learned the release of the open source (Apache license) Serengeti project from VMware. The week after, I downloaded the OVA file from VMware site, and gave my first try with a development environment after browsing through the user guide which introduces a fairly easy process to get a Hadoop cluster to run on vSphere.

Categories: Big Data, Virtualization Tags: ,

Support Next vSphere Release in VI Java API: The Plan and Work Around

June 25th, 2012 No comments

Recently I got several questions and even a bug on supporting the next release of vSphere in the open source VI Java API. The questions are mostly from VMware partners who have early access of the private beta of next release of vSphere and want to ship their own products at the same time of vSphere GA. I figure more partners may have the same question, therefore decide to answer it all here with a possible work around.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

Cisco Nexus 1000V in VMware vSphere API

April 23rd, 2012 4 comments

While working at VMware, I always wondered what Cisco Nexus 1000V looked like from VMware vSphere API. Because I didn’t have access to such a system, I had no way to investigate further. This remained a myth to me until I joined VCE where I found many Vblock systems with Cisco Nexus 1000V as part of standard configuration.

Within VMware vSphere API, there are two managed object types defined related to distributed virtual switch:  DistributedVirtualSwitch, and VmwareDistributedVirtualSwitch. As you can guess, the latter type is a subtype of the first one.

vSphere APIs for Guest Operating System Management: What’s Special and When to Use It?

March 19th, 2012 13 comments

This is a wrap-up post of recent series on vSphere guest operating system management APIs. If you missed them, here are a few links to related posts: [Note: these are not related to the vSphere Guest API.]

How to Upload File to Guest Operating System on VMware

March 12th, 2012 31 comments

My last post explained how to download file from a guest operating system. Naturally this post is about how to upload file. After a quick sample code, I will discuss how to extend the capability of existing APIs that run program inside guest operating system. My next post will wrap up this series of guest related APIs in vSphere API.

Let’s take a look at a sample code: (To run it, first check out the simple prerequisites in a previous post)

How to Download File from Guest Operating System on VMware

March 11th, 2012 23 comments

In my last few posts I discussed how to use the Guest Operating System Management API to run program, set/read environment variables. From this post, I will talk about how to move files to and from a Guest Operating System, and advanced features like moving whole directory only implemented in the Guest Operating System Management API.

Set Environment Variables in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 7th, 2012 No comments

While reading my last post on reading environment variables from a guest operating system, you may wonder how to set environment variables. Don’t be disappointed if I tell you that there is NO direct support for setting an environment variable.

However, you have a workaround – use a command directly. Unlike reading variables, there is no standard ways to do it for different operating systems. You have to first figure out what type of operating system and then run different commands. For example, if you are targeting Windows family of operating systems, you simply run the following:

Read Environment Variables in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 6th, 2012 12 comments

My last post explained how to run, kill, and list programs in guest operating system on VMware. In that post, I mentioned that you can actually use the same API, GuestProgramDirector in particular, to read environment variables. I think the explanation is detailed enough for an implementation.

Still, a good sample provides more details. That is why I decided to write a quick sample just to show how to read environment variables. While trying the sample by myself, I did find more that I will discuss after the sample code.

Run, Kill, and List Programs in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 5th, 2012 25 comments

In my last article, I announced the Guest Operating System Management API for vSphere. As promised, I will write samples to show how to use the APIs. This post explains the GuestProgramDirector type with an example.

Let’s take a quick look at the following sample:

Announcing Guest Operating System Management API for vSphere

March 5th, 2012 13 comments

Having created a sample to run a program in guest operating system using GuestProgramManager, I started to write a similar one to show how to use the GuestFileManager. Compared with the GuestProgramManager, the GuestFileManager is much more complicated to use.

New Book: Enterprise Java Applications Architecture on VMware

November 4th, 2011 5 comments

My former colleague Emad Benjamin at VMware has just published a new book on running Java on vSphere. When I was still there, I had the opportunity to review the Chapter 5 of his book.

As many of you know, Emad is a well-known expert on this subject who has spoken at various events like VMworld and helped numerous customers. You can buy his book at Amazon or from publisher directly. Remember to bring it to next year’s VMworld for his autograph.:-)

How to Save With New vSphere 5 Licensing Model

July 25th, 2011 8 comments

Disclaimer: These are my personal thoughts, and strictly mine.

I missed the big launch of vSphere 5 on July 12 because I was having my vacation. When I came back, I found so many discussions around the vSphere 5 licensing change. It’s understandable that people don’t like changes, especially if the changes may have financial impacts.

Technically, the vRAM pooling simplifies the licensing model, as pointed out by Carter Shanklin. Money wise,