Archive

Posts Tagged ‘troubleshooting’

Troubleshooting Open VMware Tools

August 2nd, 2017 2 comments

As I wrote in a previous article, installing open vmware tools can be as simple as one command on Linux. It worked for us all the time. Exceptions do happen sometimes. I recently helped a troubleshooting case in which the open vmware tools failed to start. Here are some of the troubleshooting steps and solution that you can apply if you will get into such cases.

Identify Causes

Discontinuous Response Stream from vSphere

November 28th, 2011 6 comments

Last month a question was raised in our open source vSphere Java API forum regarding an exception during HostSystem.getSummary() method call. As you can see from the stack trace, the actual exception was “org.dom4j.DocumentException.”

Lessons Learned From Troubleshooting My New PC

November 23rd, 2011 1 comment

Recently I upgraded my computer and got into all sorts of issues. I first ordered an Intel Core i7 based desktop and a 24’ monitor from Costco website. I know desktop is not the most popular one these days, but for me it’s still the most effective one for programming, writing. For one thing, the tablet even laptop screen is way too small to be productive for coding and blogging. Tweeting may be a different story. But then why would you need a tablet if you can use a smart phone for tweeting? Anyway that is a different topic that doesn’t belong here.

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How to Enable ESX Server Logs for Troubleshooting

May 12th, 2010 6 comments

Examining logs is an important way for debugging and troubleshooting a system. There are about ten log files in the ESX server for the hostd agent, which listens API calls, with the same naming pattern as hostd-?.log under the /var/log/vmware directory. The hostd-index file has the number of currently used log files.

The log entry has a similar format to that of VC server logs. Following is a quick sample:

[2008-06-21 07:24:40.769 ‘SOAP’ 64834480 trivia] Received soap request from []: checkForUpdates

The log level can be configured in the /etc/vmware/vpxa.cfg file. Just look for a section like the following. The possible levels are the same as those of VC logs: none, error, warning,info, verbose, or trivia, in an order from less to more detailed messages.