Archive

Posts Tagged ‘powerCLI’

Released: VMware vSphere API and SDK FAQ

March 6th, 2011 25 comments

After working on this for weeks, I am pleased to announce the first release of VMware vSphere API and SDK Frequently Asked Questions. It includes 70+ questions and trustable answers in 6 different categories: General, Getting Started, Language Bindings, VI Java API, API Usage, Troubleshooting.

From now on, before posting any question to any forum please read this FAQ page. For the best readability, I decided not to allow comments on that page. But your feedbacks and suggestions are always important. Please feel free to use this post for comments and discussions. Based on your inputs, I will continue to enhance the FAQs.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , ,

Free ESXi and API/CLI support

January 27th, 2011 8 comments

I think there is a pretty good understanding on this topic, but questions still come up once in a while in VI Java API community and my inbox. Some people got errors while trying to manage free ESXi servers via API. The API support of free ESXi is limited to ready only according to a VMware KB article:

vCLI, PowerCLI, and vSphere SDk for Perl are limited to read-only access for the free vSphere Hypervisor edition. To enable full functionality of vCLI on a VMware ESXi host, the host must be licensed with vSphere Essentials, vSphere Essential Plus, vSphere Standard, vSphere Advanced, vSphere Enterprise, or vSphere Enterprise Plus.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , , ,

VMware vSphere PowerCLI Alternative on Linux?

May 17th, 2010 3 comments

After creating a light virtual appliance last year, Timo Sugliani continued with a full fledged version of virtual appliance with all you need for vSphere development with Java and Jython. This is what Timo called “my linux powershell toolkit.” The biggest advantage is that you are no longer limited by Windows as your development platform.

Demystifying 3 “View”s from VMware

March 23rd, 2010 6 comments

After I blogged the top 5 myths of vSphere API, William Lam suggested me to write a bit more on the views in his comments. If you haven’t followed him (@lamw) at Twitter yet, you may want to. His vGhetto Perl repository is one of the best resources for people who use VI Perl.

For sure, VMware loves the term “view”. As far as I know, there are 3 different ”views.” Two of them are for APIs; the last one is for the desktop product family. We are not going to talk about the product View in this blog. You can find more information at VMware web site.

Let’s instead focus on the two “Views” for developers: one is in VI Perl and .NET/PowerCLI; the other is part of the core vSphere API.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , , ,

VMware PEX 2010 – Day Four

February 11th, 2010 No comments

After my presentation yesterday, I had more time on the break-out sessions and self paced lab today.

Accelerate Your Services With VMware Services Automation Tools

This session is by Budianto Bong, VMware Sr. Product Manager. He demoed three tools from VMware PSO that help consulting partners: Migration Manager, Desktop Reference Architecture Workload Simulator, and HealthAnalyzer. The first one is not the P2V converter, but a management tool that tracks, manages, and reports large scale migration projects.

Using the VMware vSphere PowerCLI for Automated Installation And Configuration of ESXi and vCenter for ISV Partners

This is a joint presentation by VMware TAM Ken Brady, and CareFusion network engineer Fisk Shogren. Ken introduced the basics of PowerCLI and VMware TAP programs. Fish showed off his PowerShell code that is used to set up the environment, which took 2 days, if lucky, of manual work before. It’s a great example on how much you can get by automating vSphere API, particularly with PowerCLI. I handed over my business card so that Fisk can show more of his code later.

Getting Stoned With “Project Onyx

4 Ways to WIN $2,500 Prize With vSphere Java API

February 4th, 2010 3 comments

You may have read blogs from my colleagues Mike DiPetrillo, Duncan Epping about the VMware Script-O-Mania contest. The prizes are $2,500 (1st), $1,000 (2nd), and $500(3rd) respectively. The contest ends in March 15, 2010. So act quickly!

“Wait, how can I WIN the prizes?”

Well, first of all, you want to read carefully the criteria. Note that your script is for System Administrators with ESXi. So it could be for initial server set up, health monitoring, trouble shooting, reporting auditing, or anything else that is cool and creative. I suggest you talk to system administrators what REAL PAINS they have, and how they would like to fix the problems.

When you are clear what problems to solve, then let’s move on.

If you are already familiar with PowerCLI and RCLI, you should probably stick with them. You can get helps from VMware Developer Community.

If not, open source VI Java API can help you!

Here are 4 ways the API can do for you to win the $2,500: