Archive

Posts Tagged ‘plug-in’

How to Create Plugin Framework Using AngularJS

February 22nd, 2016 No comments

As I mentioned earlier, the AngularJS is an amazing JavaScript framework. It separates the model from view, and really makes programming in JavaScript pleasant. We actually use it in our recently released product DoubleCloud vSearch. I have personally used it for almost one year now and like it a lot even though I am not yet an expert.

Refreshing vSphere Web Client Plugin

February 11th, 2014 1 comment

While debugging a vSphere Web Client plugin project, I found it’s not easy to refresh the services with the Virgo server which acts as the back end for the plugin GUI but as client for the vCenter server. Packaged as OSGi bundle, it’s supposed to be easy to reload the service. Mixed together with various components in the plugins, however, it’s sometimes not quite straight forward for the re-deployment for updated code. Here is a brute force approach I found while playing with it.

3 Easy Ways Connecting to Your VM in Private Cloud

February 24th, 2010 30 comments

Several folks asked me about how to use vSphere(VI) Java API to connect to a VM running on vSphere. The quick answer is vSphere Java API is not designed for this. You will need VMware Remote Console, browser plug-in, remote desktop/VNC, SSH client etc. However, it can help you to get the information required by the console or plug-in. Tal Altman from CISCO suggested that it be a topic for doublecloud.org. Here it is.

There are 3 ways to connect to the VM from your client side outside the vSphere and Web Access which have built-in support for console access.

  1. Using VMware Remote Console which is a standalone application
  2. Using browser plug-in to either IE or Firefox (Note: this is NOT supported by VMware. Please don’t call the company tech support for this.)
  3. Using Remote Desktop, VNC or SSH

The first two connect to the ESX host, and work even there is no guest OS installed on the VM. The last one assumes you have guest OS installed, and have IP network and server components in place already.

Note that these 3 ways work for the VMs in the public cloud as well if the related ports are open in your firewall. It is, however, not the case for most enterprises, therefore I particularly say it’s for VMs in private cloud. If you don’t have firewall issue, feel free to give it a try with public cloud as well.

Let’s go over one by one in details and see how vSphere Java API helps.