Archive

Posts Tagged ‘ovf’

VMDeployer 1.11 Released: More Choices to Export OVA and OVA with Multi-threading

November 30th, 2017 No comments

It’s been 6 weeks since my last blog post announcing 1.9. There was actually 1.10 release in the middle which I did not have time to write about it. The biggest change in 1.10 is the enhancement to the virtual machine management: change from many buttons to the menu for VM related operations, and add a few more operations like edit settings. With these, it’s fairly easy and fast to get your daily VM management work done.

VMDeployer 1.9 Released: More Stable and More User Friendly

October 18th, 2017 4 comments

After releasing 1.8, I became extremely busy with other projects. But I still use the software frequently, in other word, “eat my own dog food.” As result, I found a few bugs here and there and things to improve.

Today I couldn’t use the Web Client due to flash crash. After trying different ways to roll back, I could not get the workarounds work. Then I started to use the VMDeployer 1.8 for virtual machine management, and found it really helpful and fast too. That also reminded me to have a new release as soon as possible.

VMDeployer 1.8 Released: Full and Fast Datastore Browser Support

September 13th, 2017 4 comments

We released 1.7 before VMworld and then headed to Vegas for the conference. I gave a tech talk at the vBrownBag on the VMware APIs, especially the full vSphere REST APIs. We will release our vSphere REST APIs soon. Stay tuned. If you are interested in early access, please feel free to ping me.

VM Deployer 1.7 Released with GUI Enhancements: Best Tool to Import and Export Virtual Machines

August 23rd, 2017 2 comments

Here is another release of VM Deployer – version 1.7. It includes the following features and fixes, most of which are GUI related for greater convenience and elegance. I am pretty confident this tool is now the most intuitive and most convenient tool available now for deploying and exporting virtual machines, even though the initial design goal was to work around vSphere Web Client which cannot deploy our search engine product.

VM Deployer 1.6 Released: Pure Java Command Line And Better UI to Import and Export OVF

August 16th, 2017 2 comments

After 1.5 release last week, I have made a few more big enhancements as detailed below:

VM Deployer 1.5 Released: VM Power Management, Deletion, and Regular Expression

August 8th, 2017 2 comments

Since the first release of VMDeployer, we’ve seen so many downloads that we decided to invest more time even though it’s a free tool. The community support can be bigger motivation than anything else.

Here we have this 1.5 release which adds a few more features. Most of these features are there for users to have complete end-to-end user experiences. I will explain why under each item.

Deploy OVA or OVF in Scalable and Automatic Way: Free VMDeployer 1.2 Released

July 20th, 2017 2 comments

The VMDeployer Java GUI application is a tool we created for our customers. We use it quite often thus see different requirements coming in and quickly implement them. Within 3 weeks, we now have yet another release and would like to share with the community. Please feel free to register and download it here.

Here are a few features and issues fixed in this 1.2 release:

Free Tiny GUI Tool to Deploy OVA or OVF to All Versions of VMware vSphere: VMDeployer 1.1 Released

June 30th, 2017 2 comments

With the release of version 1.0 of our free GUI tool to deploy virtual machines on all platforms, we’ve successfully solved the issue of deploying our search appliance using the vSphere Web Client. We have a few more happy new customers ever since.

However, it could not deploy the NSX manager because 1.0 does not support OVF properties. To be exact, the deployment goes through, but the deployed NSX Manager VM cannot power on due to the required OVF value is not set for the admin password.

Free Java GUI to Deploy VMs onto vSphere of All Versions – A Solid and Fast Alternative to vSphere Web Client and ovftool

May 8th, 2017 1 comment

Recently we got quite a few complaints about installing vSearch appliance OVA onto vSphere 6.5 using the vSphere Web Client. It does not work. As a quick workaround, we told customers to try the VMware ovftool command line. While it works mostly, we still got questions and issues on the usage. For one thing, it’s not always straight-forward and easy to get the parameters right.

VMware ovftool as Development Tool: Good and Bad Parts

October 30th, 2015 No comments

If you want to export a virtual appliance for internal deployment, it’s quite easy. The vSphere Web Client or ovftool command line can take care of this easily. But it’s a different story to build a virtual appliance based software product, which should not only make it work, but also include product information.

Here are some information I learned and decisions I made from packaging an OVF product recently. Hope it would be useful for you. You can also check another post on how to compact the virtual disk for smallest OVA or VMDK.

How to Build Smaller and Faster Virtual Appliance

September 28th, 2015 1 comment

While building a new server product of its own kind, we chose virtual appliance as the package. During the development phase, we configured thin disk to save space. But for our beta customers to try out, we decided to switch to thick disk for better performance as the product has to do lots of processing and heavy disk I/O. BTW, we still have a few slots for new beta customers with have large vSphere deployments. Please contact me if you are interested.

Secret of vApp Template in vSphere

August 24th, 2010 1 comment

My colleagues and I had a discussion regarding the vApp template. After virtual machine template for virtual machine, you would expect vApp template for vApp and manage it in a similar way from the vSphere Client. But you cannot.

Most of us know that from vSphere Client, you have context menu item allowing you to convert a virtual machine to a template easily with a click. However you cannot find a similar menu item with a vApp. You can choose to convert a virtual machine inside a vApp, but then the converted template will jump out of the vApp container.

Can we have vApp template? The answer is we can, but in a different way.

System Provisioning in Cloud Computing: From Theory to Tooling (part 2)

July 1st, 2010 No comments

Application Provisioning

With the right system configuration in place, it’s time to install the applications. So why not use the same tools we used for the OS and middleware? Do we need yet another set of tools?”

It depends. You can use the same set of tools for middleware to install some applications. The middleware appears like an application to the OS as well. The difference is whether your application is stable enough and whether you need to customize per node. The tools like Puppet can be good for stable applications that can be deployed the same way across all nodes. If your application is still a work in progress and you need flexibility to tweak it, you need more specialized application provisioning tools.

The big technical difference between application and middleware provisioning tools is that application tools push the application to the nodes and remotely change anything as needed. The process is procedural.

The middleware provisioning tools normally have agents on the nodes to pull the software based on the prescribed configuration files. The process is declarative.

Beyond the “push” and “pull” difference, the application provisioning tools can also manage the lifecycles of applications (sometimes called services) distributed on different nodes with a single line of command or code. Given the nature of remote command dispatching framework, the application provisioning tool can do almost anything. If there has to be a limitation, it’s your imagination.

So if you develop applications by yourself, you most likely need application provisioning tools.

Let’s see what tools are there.

System Provisioning in Cloud Computing: From Theory to Tooling (part 1)

June 30th, 2010 No comments

Cloud computing is an evolutionary technology because it doesn’t change the computing stack at all. It simply distributes the stacks between the service providers and the users. In some sense, it is not as impactful as virtualization technology which introduced a new hypervisor layer in the computing stack and fundamentally changed people’s perception about computing with virtual machines.

But if you look closely at the latest IaaS clouds, they do leverage virtualization as a way to effectively and efficiently deploy systems. Inside one virtual machine, the computing stacks remain the same as before: from OS to middleware to application.

Keep in mind that the application is the end while the OS and middleware are the means. Customers care about applications more than the underlying infrastructure. As long as the infrastructure can support the applications, whatever the infrastructure might be is fine technically. Then the question would shift to the economic side: whatever is the most cost effective wins in infrastructure. That’s why Linux gains more shares in the cloud than in traditional IT shops.

To get to the end, you have to take a mean. In the IaaS cloud, you have to install the underlying OS and middleware before you can run your application. For the PaaS cloud, you can get away from that by focusing on application provisioning.

OS Provisioning

Remember, the software stack inside a virtual machine doesn’t change. It needs OS, middleware and application installed and configured before the application can work.

How to Import and Export OVF Packages

April 7th, 2010 103 comments

This article is based on a similar one at vSphere Java API home page. At that time, one of VMware community members sent me an email for samples of using OvfManager APIs. Then I went to office on a Saturday writing two samples, which have been validated by several folks as “working” samples.

The purpose of the samples are to illustrate the vSphere APIs. Let’s take a look at them one by one.

First, ExportOvfToLocal.java. This sample shows how to download either a VM or vApp to your local machine. The typical flow is:

  • Find the VM or vApp
  • Call their exportVm() or exportVApp() methods and get HttpNfcLease
  • Set lease time out
  • Wait for HttpNfcLease until it’s ready
  • From the HttpNfcLease.info property, find the all URLs from which you download the vmdk files
  • Call OvfManager.createDescriptor() API to create the content of ovf and save it to a file along with downloaded vmdk files.
  • Release the lease by calling httpNfcLeaseComplete() method
Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

OVF vs. VMDK

April 6th, 2010 2 comments

OVF stands for Open Virtualization Format, a platform independent, extensible packaging and distribution format for virtual machines. It’s now a DMTF standard.

VMDK stands for Virtual Machine Disk, a format that encodes a single virtual disk for a virtual machine. It’s proprietary by VMware but whose format is publicly documented by the company. You can use VDDK to manipulate the VMDKs.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,