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Posts Tagged ‘open source’

Parsing, Modifying, and Generating Java Source Code With Javaparser

June 24th, 2014 3 comments

It’s not common to do something with Java source code programmatically, but I find the javaparser project is very handy if such a use case comes up. It’s a Java 1.5 parser with AST generation and visitor support. With the API, you can access various elements in the source code like class, methods, statements, javadoc, comments, etc.

VI Java API Project Upgrade

December 18th, 2012 5 comments

During the past weekend, I upgraded the vijava API project to the new Allura platform provided by Sourceforge.net. That’s really a button click and then waited for incoming emails for status updates. It went smoothly and didn’t take long before it finished.

Note that the upgrade is limited to the project hosting, not the Web site (http://vijava.sf.net) which remains the same and continues to work as before.

Eclipse: 10 Years of Excellence

November 8th, 2011 No comments

This month Eclipse turns 10 years old. Ten years ago, IBM donated the initial Eclipse Java IDE, which was then estimated $40M, to Eclipse Foundation. It has since grown to 273 open source projects and $800M portfolio today. Quite an achievement by any standard!

This news release summarizes some of the key accomplishments:

Two Developers in VMware Community

March 9th, 2011 No comments

Many folks talk about developer enablement today because it’s a key success factor for a platform company. If you haven’t watched this video by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, you want to check it out. Also, my previous blog: CO2: The Formula For A Successful Developer Ecosystem.

To empower developers, we got to figure out who the developers are and what they want. It’s hard, if ever possible, to identify every developer in VMware community. But it’s normally easy to find out the types of the developers. In my observation, there are two types of developers (The title of this article is not that accurate, but

Welcome Cisco to Open Source VI Java Community

February 23rd, 2011 No comments

It gives me great pleasure to welcome Cisco to our open source community. Given the brand recognition of Cisco, I don’t need to explain much about the significance of its becoming part of our community.

At the end of 2009, a development team at Cisco contacted me, and then started to use the VI Java API for integration with VMware vSphere. Like many other partners, they succeeded. Here is a paragraph I received from Andrew Levin (product manager) and Louis Jia (development manager). Thanks Andrew and Louis!

Open Source In Action: Open Source Projects from VMware

December 21st, 2010 2 comments

As a leading edge software company, VMware has a long history of support for open source software in its products. It also contributes back many patches and projects to the open source community including the vijava API that I created. With SpringSource and Zimbra acquisitions, more open source projects are associated with VMware brand.

Here is a list of 10 home grown open source projects from VMware. Please feel free to click links for more details and play with them.

1. Dr. Memory. It’s “a memory monitoring tool capable of identifying memory-related programming errors such as accesses of uninitialized memory, accesses to unaddressable memory (including outside of allocated heap units and heap underflow and overflow), accesses to freed memory, double frees, memory leaks, and (on Windows) access to un-reserved thread local storage slots.”

2. Virtual USB Analyzer. A “free and open source tool for visualizing logs of USB packets, from hardware or software USB sniffer tools. As far as we know, it’s the world’s first tool to provide a graphical visualization along with raw hex dumps and high-level protocol analysis.”

Top 3 Trends Every IT Professional Should Care About

November 6th, 2010 No comments

IBM DeveloperWorks recently published the result of a survey of 2000 IT professionals excluding IBM employees. The key findings are:

  1. Cloud Computing to overtake on-premise computing. For the question, “how do you rate the potential for cloud computing to overtake on-premise computing as the primary way organizations acquire IT by 2015?” 30.4% said likely, 21.6% most likely, and 13.6% definitely.
  2. Mobile application development to dominate. 55% of respondents see app development on mobile grows than other platforms in 5 years.
  3. IT professionals need, but often lack, industry-specific knowledge. 28.3% thought moderately important, 45.6% very important, and 15.9% extremely important. This is not an IT trend per se, but represents the demands for IT professionals.

The first two findings are mentioned and somewhat confirmed by another survey by Forrest and Dr. Dobbs, which is more developer oriented:

vSphere Java API Exceeds 10,000 Downloads

October 7th, 2010 No comments

October 6, 2010, is a historical moment for VI Java API project – the total downloads exceeded 10,000. It’s two days earlier than I had expected. After yesterday’s blog on the NetApp and Brocade’s testimonials, the daily downloads suddenly doubled. When I found the stats approaching 10,000, I tweeted “vSphere Java API 9,999 downloads now. Who want to be No. 10,000?” I wish I could have been able to track who made the No. 10,000. :-)

Strictly speaking, the total had exceeded 10,000 a while back. Besides typical downloads, you can also directly sync up with the subversion. As I checked the number there, it had passed 1,000 reads early this year.

Thanks to you all, the vSphere Java API community!

10,000 downloads is not a big deal for an application especially when it’s for end users. It’s a big deal for an API, and even bigger for an enterprise API which requires vSphere environment which not every developer has access to.

Besides the download number, I would like to brag these numbers:

4 Ways to WIN $2,500 Prize With vSphere Java API

February 4th, 2010 3 comments

You may have read blogs from my colleagues Mike DiPetrillo, Duncan Epping about the VMware Script-O-Mania contest. The prizes are $2,500 (1st), $1,000 (2nd), and $500(3rd) respectively. The contest ends in March 15, 2010. So act quickly!

“Wait, how can I WIN the prizes?”

Well, first of all, you want to read carefully the criteria. Note that your script is for System Administrators with ESXi. So it could be for initial server set up, health monitoring, trouble shooting, reporting auditing, or anything else that is cool and creative. I suggest you talk to system administrators what REAL PAINS they have, and how they would like to fix the problems.

When you are clear what problems to solve, then let’s move on.

If you are already familiar with PowerCLI and RCLI, you should probably stick with them. You can get helps from VMware Developer Community.

If not, open source VI Java API can help you!

Here are 4 ways the API can do for you to win the $2,500:

CO2: The Formula For A Successful Developer Ecosystem

February 1st, 2010 No comments

Since joining VMware two and half years ago, I have been working like a consultant on partner enablement projects in various technical areas like SDK, SRM array adapter, VI Client plug-in, DRS clustering, etc. While working on these engagements, I always think about more efficient and more effective ways to get my work done and grow our developer ecosystem.

To summarize what I learned and thought, I decide to use CO2 as the success formula because it fits well when we talk about an ecosystem. The CO2 here means differently though. It represents Cash + Open source + Open communication.