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Posts Tagged ‘java’

Demystifying 3 “View”s from VMware

March 23rd, 2010 6 comments

After I blogged the top 5 myths of vSphere API, William Lam suggested me to write a bit more on the views in his comments. If you haven’t followed him (@lamw) at Twitter yet, you may want to. His vGhetto Perl repository is one of the best resources for people who use VI Perl.

For sure, VMware loves the term “view”. As far as I know, there are 3 different ”views.” Two of them are for APIs; the last one is for the desktop product family. We are not going to talk about the product View in this blog. You can find more information at VMware web site.

Let’s instead focus on the two “Views” for developers: one is in VI Perl and .NET/PowerCLI; the other is part of the core vSphere API.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , , ,

Why Some vSphere Java API Methods don’t Work with Old Servers? A Story of Compatibility

March 15th, 2010 1 comment

Many of you already know there are some changes in the vSphere API from 2.5 to 4.0. The changes include 20+ new managed object types, additional properties (including sub-properties that embedded inside the first level properties), and several inheritance structure changes.

Several managed objects like Datastore became the subtype of ManagedEntity in vSphere 4, which is different from the hierarchy in 2.5 where it’s a subtype of ExtensibleManagedObject. The changes came for good reasons – we want permission control over these managed objects.

Learning Enterprise Integration with Spring

March 12th, 2010 No comments

With SpringSource being part of VMware family, getting a Spring training is certainly a lot easier than before. For one thing, my boss doesn’t need to pay for it.:-)

I just finished my 4-day training starting from this Tuesday. It’s been pretty exhausting given that I had to get up before 7AM to match the central time. But what’s learnt worth the effort.

The coverage of the training includes:

Categories: Software Development Tags: ,

Attention Java Developers: Spring on VMware Promotion

March 10th, 2010 No comments

VMware announced today “Spring on VMware” promotion in which you may get free licenses of the tc Server in a news release.

To help you get started, VMware is pleased to announce the “Spring on VMware Promotion”. Under this promotion, all customer orders fulfilled  between March 8th 2010 and May 8th 2010 that include products (license only) from the vSphere, vCenter, View or ThinApp product family will receive 2 perpetual, production-use CPU licenses of tc Server Spring Edition 2.0 and 60 days of Evaluation Support for SpringSource (collectively referred to as the “Spring on VMware Bundle”).

Categories: News & Events Tags: ,

More Thoughts On Rich Internet Applications And Applications In General

February 21st, 2010 No comments

Compared with advances in other application development, the rich Web application development using Java is not quite there yet. Instead of simplifying JavaScript, AJAX, and JSF, we need a new head start. Don’t get me wrong, some of them are still needed and continue to work well for plain Web applications.

“Develop Once, Run Everywhere”

Adobe Flex has done a fairly good job for Web. Even better the same code can be easily tweaked to run as a standalone application with Adobe AIR. This was once an expectation for Java when it first came out to run as an Applet. Somehow it didn’t succeed in its birth place, but gained its ground at the server side instead.

JavaFX from Sun is a nice try but too late in the game. More importantly, Sun is not a client software company like Microsoft who was also late with SliverLight but has client side expertise and managed to compete. I don’t think Sun will reclaim its already lost client market at all, and therefore JavaFX is likely a candidate to be axed after Oracle’s acquisition. The investment on JavaFX should have gone to Java Swing, which is a lackluster compared with IBM SWT.

Learning Spring Faces, Security, Testing and Grail

February 19th, 2010 No comments

Done with the four day training, finally! It’s pretty exhausting given that I had to get up two hours earlier to match the Central time schedule.

Spring Faces

I talked about JavaScript and AJAX two days ago. They are all good to some extent, but seemingly disconnected from the server. You have to think and manage the Web app as two pieces, bad for the productivity.

JavaServer Faces (JSF) technology was created to solve this problem. It a server-side framework, which provides GUI components, manages their states from the server side, handles events, and etc. You can then develop a web app more like the standalone application in some sense. Because JSF manages the state from the server side, it uses more resources and less performant than it’s JS/AJAX equivalent.

Spring Faces is not a replacement for JSF, but complements in the “Spring” way. It facilitates deeper JSF and Web Flow integration, manages JSF components’ states, and provides more lightweight JSF components. Therefore, you can get leaner web application than using pure JSF.

Debugging

Several tools can be handy for your debugging:

Learning Web Flow With Spring

February 18th, 2010 No comments

Web flow is the most confusing part so far in RIA with Spring training, therefore a whole day was dedicated to this.

From a very high level, a Web flow is just like a wizard in a stand-alone application. It guides a user through several steps of interactions. Complicated wizards may branch out depending on the information entered in early steps, so do the Web flows.

Well, Web environment has its uniqueness and challenges. Spring Web Flow is designed to ease it. Like any other framework, you have to overcome the learning curve before you can really take advantage of it.

The good news is the Web Flow still fits in the MVC framework overall, just with a new set of handler mapping, handler adapter, plus the new flow executor.

Learning JavaScript + AJAX

February 17th, 2010 No comments

It’s the second day of the four day training. A lot of things were covered:

  • Modern Web UI including progressive enhancement, accessibility, and design.
  • Applying Spring JS, an abstraction around other AJAX toolkit. The coverage includes AJAX events, client side validation, and rich widgets.
  • Working directly with Dojo Toolkit, including DOM scripting and Dojo widgets (Dijit).

The progressive enhancement is a great concept. The basic idea is to have your web pages start with plain HTML and then “decorates” them with richer L&F and more interaction on the fly. The key benefit is better compatibilities with different browsers which all support HTML but not necessarily JavaScript. When JavaScript is supported by the browser, the pages are enhanced by the embedded JavaScript; when not, the pages just render well as normal HTML.

Automatically Generate Your Java Code With Onyx?

February 6th, 2010 2 comments

During last Friday VMware beer bash, I bumped into Carter Shanklin. He told me he’s ready show off how his Onyx project can help Java developers using VI Java API at Partner Exchange next week in Las Vegas. If you will be there, be sure to attend his session TEXIBP1007 – also known as “Getting Stoned with ‘Project Onyx’” on Thursday at 11:30.

4 Ways to WIN $2,500 Prize With vSphere Java API

February 4th, 2010 3 comments

You may have read blogs from my colleagues Mike DiPetrillo, Duncan Epping about the VMware Script-O-Mania contest. The prizes are $2,500 (1st), $1,000 (2nd), and $500(3rd) respectively. The contest ends in March 15, 2010. So act quickly!

“Wait, how can I WIN the prizes?”

Well, first of all, you want to read carefully the criteria. Note that your script is for System Administrators with ESXi. So it could be for initial server set up, health monitoring, trouble shooting, reporting auditing, or anything else that is cool and creative. I suggest you talk to system administrators what REAL PAINS they have, and how they would like to fix the problems.

When you are clear what problems to solve, then let’s move on.

If you are already familiar with PowerCLI and RCLI, you should probably stick with them. You can get helps from VMware Developer Community.

If not, open source VI Java API can help you!

Here are 4 ways the API can do for you to win the $2,500:

Introducing A Tiny Yet Powerful API to Manage and Automate vSphere

February 3rd, 2010 8 comments

In yesterday’s blog, I talked about a little known secret of vSphere MOB – the invisible embedded XML in the HTML pages. To take advantage of the secret, I created a client side REST API which was shipped in VI Java API 2.0.

5,000 downloads and future directions

January 9th, 2010 1 comment

Happy new year! A new posting is way overdue after I set up the blog early last December.

Today, we surpassed 5,000 downloads. This is an important milestone for the project as it indicates the adoption of this powerful yet easy-to-use API has reached a new level.