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Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Google Cloud Platform: Hello World with Service Account

March 21st, 2016 1 comment

In my last post, I showed a sample with OAuth. It works well for application on others’ behalves. For the hello world program, it’s better to run without any user’s manual interaction. Google has provided “Service Account Key” for that purpose.

When you create a new credential, the console asks the type of key. You can select the service account key, and then select the “Compute engine default service account” with P12 as the key type. The generated key will be downloaded automatically. Save it safely and it cannot download again. You can then copy the key to the project home with a name as key.p12.

Google Cloud Platform: Hello World with OAuth 2

March 16th, 2016 No comments

Google Cloud is the 3rd public cloud I tried after Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure. I used its AppEngine before and it worked pretty well. Google started very early in the cloud game but it lost the opportunity to Amazon because it over-estimated the attractiveness of its own infrastructure that runs Google search.

Paradigm Shift in Data Center Management: What’s After VMware?

March 10th, 2016 No comments

The recent release of DoubleCloud vSearch represents a paradigm shift in how we manage data center in the future. Before agreeing with me on that, let’s take a quick look at the history.

Yahoo vs. Google

When the Web first came out in the early 90s, there weren’t many Web sites and pages out there. To help us find pages of interest, a typical directory approach was used. That created the initial success for Yahoo in the first place.

What Does Oracle-Google Case Mean For Cloud Computing?

May 31st, 2012 No comments

As a software professional using Java since its very beginning, I have been following the case regarding Google’s using Java APIs in its Android OS. I don’t want to repeat what has happened so far because you can find these updates by searching the Internet. All I want to say is that the case is pretty educational not only on the technology itself but also on the legal side like patents, copyright.

Why Social Networks Are Monopolistic By Nature?

December 12th, 2011 No comments

Social networking has been the hottest area after the dot.com burst. User base is still a critical factor and far more sticky than before. It’s the connections among these users that differentiate social networking from other types of Internet services.

A connection is formed from one user to another. They cannot be on two different web sites, even though theoretically they can. Technically we can define protocols to link users, even groups, together from different sites. But it is not efficient and may not be fast enough to sync up states and discover new connections. Even more issues on business side, not to mention privacy policies.

Categories: Others Tags: , ,

ESX and ESXi: What Google Says About Them?

May 11th, 2011 No comments

Yesterday the VMware community noticed that the direct ESX download links were removed from vSphere download page. When I checked the download page, the ESX link is not with the bundles but at the end of the page in its own section.

To my own curiosity, I wonder what the adoption ratio of these two hypervisors is today. As an engineer, I don’t have sales data in front of me. Even I have, I am sure if I can share it here.

Instead, I tried

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , , , ,

Managing vSphere on Android using VI Java API

May 10th, 2011 1 comment

It’s been a while since I checked the VI Java API fling at VMware Lab last time. When I checked it again yesterday, I found something new and exciting – VI Java API on Google Android. The following comment was posted there by a gentleman called Bob:

Great framework, I used it on a recently published android application (avmcontrol – vsphere client for android), I had to tweak it a bit, however developing for android using vijava was much easier then the same for iOS4 devices.

Following the link, I found

Learning Google Web Toolkit

March 28th, 2011 No comments

Google Web Toolkit is an interesting project. It’s basically an AJAX toolkit but presents itself as a Java toolkit. The idea is that you still write Java code as you would with Java AWT, SWING, and the GWT converts it to JavaScript code for you.

But why don’t write JavaScript code directly? Well, you may know Java better than JavaScript. More importantly, Java is a typed language and easier to develop a large system than JavaScript.

Using GWT for Java developers is mostly

Must Knows About Release Engineering: Lessons From Google

December 15th, 2010 No comments

This is yet another post based on my notes taken at LISA 2010 conference. The talk is The 10 commandments in release engineering by Dinah McNutt from Google. Dinah did a great job in summarizing the basics of release engineering therefore it’s worthwhile to compile my note and share it here.

Note that although typical release engineering does not produce virtual appliances, the basic principles are the same. You will find these basics helpful as well.

Release engineering is a critical part of software engineering and should be treated as products in their own rights. But often there is disconnect between development writing the code and the system administrator who installs it. Release process is usually an afterthought.

Typical Release Process

The following steps are executed during a release run:

What Lessons You Can Learn from Google on Building Infrastructure

November 15th, 2010 No comments

Last week I attended a great talk by Google Fellow Jeffrey Dean at Stanford University. Jeff talked about his first hand experience on building software systems at Google since 1999 and lessons learned. The following summary is solely based on my notes, therefore may contain my misunderstandings.

A Brief History

During the past 10 years or so, the scale of the Google infrastructure has grown exponentially: # docs 1,000X; #query, 1,000X; per doc index, 3X; update rate from months to seconds, 50,000X; query latency, 5X; computer and computing powers, 1,000X. The underlying infrastructure has experienced 7 major revisions in the last 11 years.

At the concept level, the search infrastructure is simple. It has web servers upfront taking search queries. The queries are then passed on to two different types of servers: index servers and doc servers. For the index server, the input is the query string and the output is an array of doc-id and score pairs. For the doc servers, the input is the doc-id and query pair and the output is the title and snippet of the doc. Note that the snippet of the doc is query dependent so that you can find your keywords highlighted in the result pages. How to quickly and accurately calculate the output based on input involves a lot of advanced algorithms, and is not in the scope of Jeff’s talk.