Archive

Posts Tagged ‘devops’

Vagrant for Software Development

December 2nd, 2014 1 comment

I came across Vagrant a while back at a bookstore. After browsing it, I didn’t get my hands dirty with it until recently. I started to play with it because one of my clients uses it in setting up development environment for convenience and consistency.

Running Puppet in Client/Server Mode

February 20th, 2013 1 comment

In my last post, I introduced how to run a very simple HelloWorld script with Puppet 3.1.0 on CentOS 6.3. Although it shows how Puppet works, it’s not really how Puppet is used in real world. To get the most out of Puppet, you want to run the client/server mode where you have a master and many agents.

Part 1: Install Puppet server

Categories: Cloud Computing Tags: , , ,

Running Puppet HelloWorld on CentOS 6.3

February 12th, 2013 5 comments

Puppet is a very well-known configuration management tool that has been adopted by many enterprises and service providers. VMware recently invested $30M in Puppet Labs, the company behind it. It’s clear that VMware needs such a tool if it wants to grow in data center space.

I actually got a book from last year’s PuppetConf in San Francisco and browsed through it on my flights. As with any other technology, reading it does not mean getting it. To get my hands dirty, I played with it in my home lab last week.

Categories: Cloud Computing Tags: , , ,

Developer/Administrator (devops) Meet up at VMworld 2011

August 18th, 2011 2 comments

As part of the VMworld #vMeetups in the Community Lounge, this developer/administrator (a.k.a. devops) meet up will take place on August 30th from 12PM to 1PM at VMworld Community Louge, located just outside the entrance to the solution exchange. Because it’s lunch hour, please feel free to bring your lunch.

This event offers you a unique opportunity to meet and network with other professionals who create or use VMware APIs and CLIs for integration and automation.

From Developer to Devops: What System Administration Skills Should You Know?

December 14th, 2010 2 comments

With the rising trend of devops movement, I was curious about the system administration from a software developer’s perspective. That’s why I sat through Adam Moskowitz’s session “The Path to Senior Sysadmin.” Adam summarized the system administrator’s skills to three categories: hard tech skills, squishy tech sill, and software skills as detailed in following. Again, this is based on my note taken from LISA 2010 conference. For other posts related to the conference, check here.

Hard Tech Skills

  • All the commands for system administration;
  • System backup;
  • Some programming skills like Shell scripting, Perl/Python, C (read);
  • Software engineering knowledge like versioning, process;

4 Rules for Converting Onyx Generated Code

May 5th, 2010 No comments

VMware PM Carter Shanklin (@cshanklin) once gave a great presentation on how to use Onyx with Java development at PEX 2010. I covered it briefly in a previous blog, and left out the “4 rules” hoping Carter would help.

As many of you have already known, Carter moved on to SpringSource division as the PM for tc server. So he has been pretty busy with his transition. With his coverage on both administrator and developer oriented products, he is right on the wave of devops movement. Make sure you follow him at Twitter.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , ,

What Does DevOps Mean for Cloud Professionals?

April 29th, 2010 No comments

I heard about DevOps a while back but didn’t really look into it. My initial understanding was that the roles of developer and system administrator would merge into one called devops. Last week, I attended a DevOps meet up at Palo Alto and got the chance to learn from others about DevOps.

The hosting organization even wrote up a good blog defining what a DevOps is. According to the blog,

DevOps is, in many ways, an umbrella concept that refers to anything that smoothes out the interaction between development and operations. However, the ideas behind DevOps run much deeper than that.

So the DevOps is more about a movement than merging of two roles. The basic idea behind the DevOps is to breach the wall between development and operations.

Traditionally developers ship products which are then run by operators in other companies. In this new age where much of software is delivered as services, the developers run their software directly. When there is a problem, the developers must fix it right away. That is why you see engineers at Google required to rotate on calls for support. When more companies ship software as services, it’s natural that more engineers will have two hats on their heads. The DevOps concept is not really new, but the terminology is.