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Archive for the ‘Virtualization’ Category

How to Download File from Guest Operating System on VMware

March 11th, 2012 22 comments

In my last few posts I discussed how to use the Guest Operating System Management API to run program, set/read environment variables. From this post, I will talk about how to move files to and from a Guest Operating System, and advanced features like moving whole directory only implemented in the Guest Operating System Management API.

Set Environment Variables in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 7th, 2012 No comments

While reading my last post on reading environment variables from a guest operating system, you may wonder how to set environment variables. Don’t be disappointed if I tell you that there is NO direct support for setting an environment variable.

However, you have a workaround – use a command directly. Unlike reading variables, there is no standard ways to do it for different operating systems. You have to first figure out what type of operating system and then run different commands. For example, if you are targeting Windows family of operating systems, you simply run the following:

Read Environment Variables in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 6th, 2012 12 comments

My last post explained how to run, kill, and list programs in guest operating system on VMware. In that post, I mentioned that you can actually use the same API, GuestProgramDirector in particular, to read environment variables. I think the explanation is detailed enough for an implementation.

Still, a good sample provides more details. That is why I decided to write a quick sample just to show how to read environment variables. While trying the sample by myself, I did find more that I will discuss after the sample code.

Run, Kill, and List Programs in Guest Operating System on VMware

March 5th, 2012 25 comments

In my last article, I announced the Guest Operating System Management API for vSphere. As promised, I will write samples to show how to use the APIs. This post explains the GuestProgramDirector type with an example.

Let’s take a quick look at the following sample:

Announcing Guest Operating System Management API for vSphere

March 5th, 2012 13 comments

Having created a sample to run a program in guest operating system using GuestProgramManager, I started to write a similar one to show how to use the GuestFileManager. Compared with the GuestProgramManager, the GuestFileManager is much more complicated to use.

Run Program in Guest Operating System on VMware

February 27th, 2012 51 comments

Integrating VIX API into vSphere API is a great decision VMware made for its vSphere 5.0 release. Instead of working on two separate APIs, you now have one to deal with. It also solves the portability issue of VIX APIs which is tied to a specific platform – VIX has three versions for Windows, 32-bit Linux, and 64-bit Linux.

VMware Developer Community: Time to Update Contents

February 21st, 2012 No comments

Thanks to John Troyer and VMware community managers, I successfully changed my email for login with the community recently. During this long weekend I spent a little time checking out the developer community.

I found that the static contents out there are largely outdated. In my estimation, it hasn’t been actively maintained for more than one year. Listing outdated contents not only confuses the community, but also lets go a great opportunity to educate and influence developers.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: ,

VMware Partner Exchange 2012: Day Three

February 16th, 2012 1 comment

Today is the last day of VMware Partner Exchange 2012. There’s no keynote, therefore I went directly to breakout sessions.
The first one I attended was “SRM 5.0 and vSphere Replication – Understanding the Use Cases and Implementation Options.” The SRM used to manage the storage array that actually replicate LUNs to pair arrays in remote sites. This results in a restriction that the storage arrays must be compatible, which means they must come from same vendor and probably same model. When I was at VMware, I helped several partners with their storage array adapters for SRM. With vSphere replication, the replication happens at higher level thus the restriction goes away. Coming with the flexibility is slightly slower performance. Like anything else, you simply cannot have all the best but you can apply right technology for certain use case, for example, use vSphere replication for ROBO (remote office, branch office) use case.

Categories: News & Events, Virtualization Tags: ,

VMware Partner Exchange 2012: Day Two

February 15th, 2012 2 comments

Same as yesterday, the conference started with keynotes. The first one was by Carl Eschenbach, VMware Co-President of Customer Operations, followed by a motivational keynote by Bill Taylor, founding editor of Fast Company Magazine. As a technical professional, I always try my best to get more business insights and perspectives therefore I attend business related keynotes whenever possible.

Categories: News & Events, Virtualization Tags: ,

VMware Partner Exchange 2012: Day One

February 14th, 2012 No comments

Today is the first day of VMware Partner Exchange 2012 in Las Vegas. As usual, it started with keynotes, presented by Scott Aronson (Senior Vice President, Global Channels and Alliances), Paul Maritz (CEO), and Steve Herrod (CTO & SVP, R&D) consecutively. I personally didn’t find a lot new but mostly rehashed from previous keynotes. Nevertheless, there were several interesting numbers from the three keynotes:

  • $41.5 billion: private cloud opportunity by 2015.
  • 350,000: VMware customer base.
Categories: News & Events, Virtualization Tags: ,

Will Virtualization Really Benefit Environment?

February 13th, 2012 3 comments

Today I read an interesting article “The Efficiency Paradox” in latest Business Week magazine. It reviews the book Conundrum: How Scientific Innovation, Increased Efficiency, and Good Intention Can Make Our Energy and Climate Problem Worse by David Owen. I haven’t read the book but got the main idea of the book from the article.

1xN to Nx1: The World Is Flat In Computing

February 6th, 2012 2 comments

The first part of the title of this article may seem like mathematics, but it’s really not. This is just about software packaging – a topic not so often discussed. In plain English, it basically says something like: one application with N features vs. N applications, each of which has one feature. More generally speaking, it can describe software entity with sub-elements. I will discuss it in the contexts of mobile/desktop, and virtual/physical.

Announcing Code Generator For vSphere Java API

February 1st, 2012 12 comments

As I tweeted last week, there would be a big announcement when the open source VI Java API gets 20,000 downloads. It hit target yesterday. To celebrate it, I decide to release the code generator for the API, which William (@lamw) rated as “awesome.”

Management Middleware: The Future of Virtualization and Cloud Marketecture

January 29th, 2012 No comments

While installing and configuring vCloud Director recently, I kept thinking how to simplify it by removing un-necessary concepts and steps. To be fair, vCloud Director as of version 1.5 does a decent job to provide a high level abstraction for cloud infrastructure. Still it can be significantly improved just like every other new technology. Note that I pick vCloud Director as an example for the following discussion simply because VMware is the leader in virtualization space and what it does has ripple effects on other vendors.

Why vSphere PropertyCollector Is Hard By Design?

January 18th, 2012 7 comments

If you’ve had a chance to use vSphere Web Service SDK, you must know the PropertyCollector is very hard to use. It takes a newcomer quite some time to learn how to use it, and even more time to learn to use it effectively. Luckily, you no longer have to if you use the open source vSphere Java API (a.k.a. vijava) because it has encapsulated the PropertyCollector behind these newly added getter methods of the managed object types.

Physical is New Virtual

January 15th, 2012 No comments

I went to EMC office at Milford, MA last week for a 5 day training class on Vblock Administration. As you may have known, VCE Vblock is the industry’s first and leading converged infrastructure with compute, network, and storage from industry leaders. For the compute, it uses Cisco UCS. If you have followed my blog, you should know that I have blogged about the UCS emulator and XML management APIs.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

BusyBox on Windows

December 21st, 2011 2 comments

Even if you haven’t heard about BusyBox, you may have used it. It runs in every ESXi, which doesn’t have a full OS as console like classic ESX. Still, you need an easy way to interact the hypervisor directly. So the ESXi includes a tiny console that uses BusyBox (reduced version) due to its small size.

The BusyBox has been ported to Windows as well. You can download the 600+K executable here. It’s really a simple exe file and you can place it anywhere.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , , ,

Running DSL on VMware Player

December 20th, 2011 No comments

DSL is an overloaded acronym standing for many different things. I first knew it as Digital Subscriber Line for Internet connection, and then Domain Specific Language. Recently I learnt a new one: Damn Small Linux. As you see the word small, you may think it’s for embedded system. It’s not.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

Hacking VMware Tools ISO from vSphere

December 9th, 2011 10 comments

In a recent experiment, I needed to get the VMware Tools installer. Somehow after searching many different places, I couldn’t find it. While writing this article, I found a link to all the installers organized per ESX versions and CPU architectures. The installers are single files, different from an installable CD which I hacked.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

What Roles Does A User Have in vSphere?

November 30th, 2011 8 comments

If you have read my previous article on vSphere security model, you know how it works. Still, you may wonder what roles a particular user may have, as asked in a recent email from one of my former VMware colleagues.

In an operating system, a user is assigned to a group or multiple groups therefore granted a certain permissions. In vSphere, a role is simply a set of privileges and that is it. It’s natural to think of a role as a group sometimes, but it’s really not.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,