Archive

Archive for the ‘Virtualization’ Category

UI Extensibility of System Center Virtual Machine Manager, Compared with vSphere

April 17th, 2013 4 comments

To my curiosity, I attended the session “Building UI Add-ins for System Center 2012 SP1 Virtual Machine Manager” by Jonobie Ford, who is the program manager of the add-in SDK. As you may know, I wrote several docs on vSphere Client plug-in and helped many partners to develop their plug-ins during my days at VMware.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: , ,

A Quick Hack to Database Failure in vCenter Appliance

April 14th, 2013 2 comments

After playing with the vCenter appliance simulator feature documented by William, I got into a show stopper that vCenter service (VPXD) could not be started. I don’t think it’s related to the simulator feature at all. My guess is that it’s caused by a sudden power off of the virtual machine but didn’t try to reproduce the problem that way – I care more to fix it than anything else.

How to Use the Missing Virtual Network Editor in VMware Player

March 13th, 2013 18 comments

For most people who use the VMware Player, DHCP is good enough for the NAT network. That means the IP addresses of your virtual machines may change after each powering on.

What if you want to have static IP addresses? It’s pretty easy as long as it’s in the same subnet. For example, if the VMnet8 has IP address of 192.168.47.1, your virtual machines should be configured in the same network say 192.168.47.x, where X can be any value from 3 to 254 (2 reserved for gateway, 255 broadcast by default).

Categories: Virtualization Tags: ,

Configure Static IP Address on Linux VM in VMware Player

March 12th, 2013 20 comments

If you run VMware Player, you would have 3 networking options for virtual machines running there: Bridged, NAT, Host-Only. In the latest 5.0.1, I also found a new one: LAN Segment. This blog has a nice explanation on these three settings if you want to get more details.

In most of cases, I use NAT for networking because the virtual machine can have Internet access which allows me to install additional software as needed. By default, VMware Player uses DHCP to dynamically assign IP address while using NAT. So you cannot guarantee to get same IP address after each rebooting.

vSphere vs. Hyper-V: Difference of Virtual Machine States

January 6th, 2013 7 comments

While reading articles about Microsoft Hyper-V, I found that Hyper-V seemed to have different states for virtual machines from VMware vSphere. The virtual machine in Hyper-V is represented by the Msvm_ComputerSystem class. If you are familiar with VMware vSphere, you know the equivalent in vSphere is VirtualMachine. At first sight, the Hyper-V APIs may not look straight-forward. The Hyper-V APIs is actually based on Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), which is essentially CIM from DMTF.

Cisco Nexus 1000V Distributed Virtual Switch: Command Line Examples

January 3rd, 2013 10 comments

I just took three day Cisco Nexus 1000V training before Christmas. It’s a pretty good experience to play with the commands in the VSM appliance although I am still not quite familiar with these commands yet. Nevertheless, I managed to run through all the 9 labs thanks to the online lab that I could access even after class. To help myself to remember what I did, I listed a few commands that often needed in managing Nexus 1000V.

VI Java API Project Upgrade

December 18th, 2012 5 comments

During the past weekend, I upgraded the vijava API project to the new Allura platform provided by Sourceforge.net. That’s really a button click and then waited for incoming emails for status updates. It went smoothly and didn’t take long before it finished.

Note that the upgrade is limited to the project hosting, not the Web site (http://vijava.sf.net) which remains the same and continues to work as before.

DoubleCloud VM Connector for Remote Desktop Connection Manager in VMware Environment

December 2nd, 2012 7 comments

In my previous article, I introduced the Remote Desktop Connection Manager. It’s highly recommended to use it over the virtual machine console which all goes through the ESXi management IP therefore is not good for performance especially when there are many concurrent connections to virtual machines running on a same physical host.

Even if you are convinced on connecting to virtual machines directly, you will find it’s not convenient to add many virtual machines to the Remote Desktop Connection Manager. That is why I decided to write a small tool to automate it.

Announcing GA of VI Java API 5.1 Supporting vSphere 5.1

November 27th, 2012 11 comments

It’s been two months since I announced beta of VI Java API 5.1 supporting vSphere 5.1 on September 23. I got many emails asking for the GA date from ISVs and IHVs as the API is now a corner stone in their products. With the long (could be longer, BTW) Thanksgiving holidays, I got some time to review the fixes and release the GA version. I intended to announce it yesterday but somehow extra spam comments pushed the database behind over 100MB limit thus I could not post any new article.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

Conceptual Deep Dive in VMware vCenter Single Sign On

November 4th, 2012 3 comments

One of the key new features in vSphere 5.1 is the Single Sign On. Because it’s new and also complicated, I’ve heard it’s not easy to get it right the first time. Experts recommend that you should play with it in a test or staging environment before upgrading your production environment.

What’s New in vSphere 5.1 SDK and APIs

October 31st, 2012 2 comments

I know it’s well past the GA date of the product on September 10, but I still decide to write this what’s new for the completeness of vSphere SDK FAQs.

As I always emphasize, the SDK/APIs are “view” to the product (you can think it as “model” here). Therefore to understand a SDK/APIs, it’s important to check out the product first. No exception for the new features: what’s new in vSphere decides what’s new in vSphere SDK/APIs. For that, you want to check out the What’s New in VMware vSphere 5.1 at VMware website.

VMware vSphere SDK with Visual Studio 2012

October 30th, 2012 7 comments

While trying latest Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Express, I also played with the C# samples of the VMware vSphere SDK. Unfortunately, there isn’t direct support for VS 2012 but for VS 2010, 2008, and 2005. However, you can easily create project files for the VS 2012 by yourself assuming you are already familiar with the Visual Studio environment.

A Quick Hack With vSphere Web Client Timeout

October 24th, 2012 8 comments

Last week I released a tiny tool called DoubleCloud Client, which eases the usage of vSphere Web Client. I didn’t have time to add another hack which can bypass the session timeout of vSphere Web Client.

By default, vSphere Web Client times out after 30 minutes of inactivity according to VMware Doc. After timing out, you got to re-login and click back to the page you left out. It’s good for the security, but also not convenient. If you use it on your own desktop and have set up screen saver with password protection, you don’t really need this security feature.

A Tiny Tool to Ease the Use of VMware vSphere Web Client

October 14th, 2012 11 comments

In my previous article, I talked about why Web is not a good choice as the primary GUI for vSphere. I also mentioned that I was working on Ua small app to enhance the user experience of vSphere Web Client.

Today I am happy to announce a small application I developed recently using latest Visual Studio 2012 Express which is free from Microsoft. Although known with my work on Java in the community, I am pretty open to any programming languages and tools that are best to get work done. This time it happens to be C# and .NET. :-)

Why Web is Not Good as Primary GUI for vSphere

October 9th, 2012 11 comments

I recently started to use the new Flex based vSphere Web Client while working on the open source vijava to support vSphere 5.1. Overall I like the look and feel, and particularly the extensibility story around the new architecture. However, I am not impressed by the performance – I saw way more “loading…” and clock cursor than I expected. Technically, I don’t think that is the direction VMware wants to bet on as the primary user interface for its flagship product vSphere.

XML APIs to Manage Cisco Nexus 1000V

September 30th, 2012 5 comments

If you’ve been following my blog, you may remember I wrote Cisco Nexus 1000V in VMware vSphere API about half year ago. The Cisco Nexus 1000V actually has another APIs based on XML. Interestingly, it’s implemented over SSH, but not HTTP or HTTPS.

The Nexus 1000V APIs follows two ITEF standards: RFC 4741 NETCONF Configuration Protocol, and RFC 4742 Using the NETCONF Configuration Protocol over Secure SHell (SSH). The first one is pretty long with close to 100 pages, but fortunately Wikipedia has a much shorter introduction. The RFC 4742 is just 8 pages and pretty easy to browse through.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: ,

Announcing Public Beta of VI Java API 5.1 Supporting vSphere 5.1

September 23rd, 2012 6 comments

After VMware released the vSphere 5.1 on the night of September 10, I finally got a chance to look at the new vSphere API, including the API reference and more important to me the WSDL files.

I was relieved to find out that there weren’t many changes. No single managed object is added to the vSphere 5.1 API, meaning a lot less work than I thought for vijava API to support the latest vSphere 5.1.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

Behind vRAM – What’s VMware’s Deepest Fear?

September 5th, 2012 4 comments

The vRAM was the license model VMware used in vSphere 5.0. It basically limits the usage of virtual memory, which is different from physical memory, per license. When first announced last year, it created a lot of angry customers overnight even though VMware estimated that the license scheme wouldn’t affect most of the existing customers. Later on, VMware doubled the amount of virtual memory and implemented a cap per license, and insisted to roll out the modified license model despite strong objections from customers.

Why VMware Needs A New Direction

August 12th, 2012 2 comments

In my last article, I analyzed the real motivation behind the VMware’s recent intention to acquire Nicira. In this article, I am going to review VMware’s past strategies and predict its long term strategies. In short, VMware’s past growth strategy is “vertical,” and its future growth strategy should be “horizontal.”

Past Strategy Review

What Are Cisco’s Options to VMware’s Nicira Deal?

August 5th, 2012 No comments

VMware’s acquisition of Nicira posted a big risk on Cisco’s future control of networking market. The risk was in fact there from day one of VMware ESX with virtual switches and then distributed virtual switches, which reduces the need for customers to buy physical geeks from Cisco because virtual machines use “free” virtual ports. For the inter-physical server communication, customers still need Cisco and other vendors even though the volume is not as high as otherwise. That is why Cisco quickly came up with its own distributed virtual switch Nexus 1000v to stay relevant in the virtualization market.