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Archive for the ‘Cloud Computing’ Category

Your Cloud, My Cloud, or Our Cloud? Rethinking VMware Public Cloud Strategy

August 19th, 2012 2 comments

About two weeks ago, CRN published an article about VMware Zephyr project. According to the article, VMware plans to launch a public IaaS cloud to compete with Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure, and more directly with existing VMware vCloud service providers. The reason for the move is “because none of its service provider partners are moving fast enough. Look at the adoption rate of vCloud Director with service providers — it is non-existent.”

Categories: Cloud Computing Tags: ,

Why VMware Needs A New Direction

August 12th, 2012 2 comments

In my last article, I analyzed the real motivation behind the VMware’s recent intention to acquire Nicira. In this article, I am going to review VMware’s past strategies and predict its long term strategies. In short, VMware’s past growth strategy is “vertical,” and its future growth strategy should be “horizontal.”

Past Strategy Review

What Are Cisco’s Options to VMware’s Nicira Deal?

August 5th, 2012 No comments

VMware’s acquisition of Nicira posted a big risk on Cisco’s future control of networking market. The risk was in fact there from day one of VMware ESX with virtual switches and then distributed virtual switches, which reduces the need for customers to buy physical geeks from Cisco because virtual machines use “free” virtual ports. For the inter-physical server communication, customers still need Cisco and other vendors even though the volume is not as high as otherwise. That is why Cisco quickly came up with its own distributed virtual switch Nexus 1000v to stay relevant in the virtualization market.

What VMware Didn’t Tell You About Nicira Deal

July 29th, 2012 1 comment

On this past Monday VMware announced to buy Nicira for $1.26 billion. Congratulations to many of my former VMware colleagues who joined Nicira and will return back to VMware soon.

Overall this deal aligns well with VMware’s newly found vision on software defined data center. You must have read many of similar explanations and comments from various sources including this one from VMware CTO Steve Herrod, and this one by Nicira cofounder and CTO Martin Casado.

Will Enterprise Hardware Be Hot Again?

July 23rd, 2012 No comments

BusinessWeek recently published an article “In Silicon Valley, Hardware is Hot Again.” Almost all big names started to sell hardware now, Microsoft, Google, and Apple of course. Apple’s stellar success in iPhone and iPad disrupted the conventional wisdom that software is higher in margin compared to hardware. Also, Apple’s hardware and software combined devices posts a real risk for Microsoft and Google. To be exact, the hardware in the article title should really be software bundled hardware. That is why Google and Microsoft had to get into hardware business competing directly against Apple.

The Data Stack: The Next Focus of Cloud Computing?

June 6th, 2012 No comments

Many of us have already heard of the term “software stack.” It shows the software layers in boxes stacking up on each other, all the way from operating system, to middleware, and to applications. When these layers are offered as services, we have IaaS (Infrastructure As A Service), PaaS (Platform As A Service), and SaaS (Software As A Service) respectively for so called cloud service stack. These two stacks are essentially similar if not the same.

The Data is the Cloud

June 3rd, 2012 No comments

Once upon a time, there was a famous vision – “The network is the computer.” If you have been with ITindustry long enough, you would know what the company was behind the vision. Inspired the vision for computer, I am inventing yet another one for cloud – “The data is the cloud.”

What Does Oracle-Google Case Mean For Cloud Computing?

May 31st, 2012 No comments

As a software professional using Java since its very beginning, I have been following the case regarding Google’s using Java APIs in its Android OS. I don’t want to repeat what has happened so far because you can find these updates by searching the Internet. All I want to say is that the case is pretty educational not only on the technology itself but also on the legal side like patents, copyright.

Redefining Software in Cloud Age

May 30th, 2012 2 comments

As software professionals, we may still use the same programming languages and tools as 10 years ago. But there has been a fundamental shift in how we think of software, and make and consume software.

Static blueprints

Traditionally software really means blueprints, which are used to construct running software instances. The blueprints include binary code, installer, and related documentations guiding the installation and configuration of the software. Software vendors make the software packages and sell them to customers who then deploy and run them.

1xN to Nx1: The World Is Flat In Computing

February 6th, 2012 2 comments

The first part of the title of this article may seem like mathematics, but it’s really not. This is just about software packaging – a topic not so often discussed. In plain English, it basically says something like: one application with N features vs. N applications, each of which has one feature. More generally speaking, it can describe software entity with sub-elements. I will discuss it in the contexts of mobile/desktop, and virtual/physical.

Management Middleware: The Future of Virtualization and Cloud Marketecture

January 29th, 2012 No comments

While installing and configuring vCloud Director recently, I kept thinking how to simplify it by removing un-necessary concepts and steps. To be fair, vCloud Director as of version 1.5 does a decent job to provide a high level abstraction for cloud infrastructure. Still it can be significantly improved just like every other new technology. Note that I pick vCloud Director as an example for the following discussion simply because VMware is the leader in virtualization space and what it does has ripple effects on other vendors.

Cloud Innovation: Interesting Use Cases

January 21st, 2012 1 comment

As I predicted for 2011, the cloud will be the ultimate powerhouse for mobile devices. The reason is simple: although fancy and stylish, the mobile devices typically do not have enough computing power and storage space for certain applications.

Random Thoughts on IT Automation

January 6th, 2012 5 comments

IT automation is key to IT efficiency, agility and control. Here are some of my recent thoughts on this topic. Please feel free to share yours.

People and Automation

  • All automations ultimately start from people, not the other way around.
  • Although automation has a role, it never takes the place of a good system administrator.
  • Not everything can be automated, and not everything is worth being automated.
Categories: Cloud Computing Tags: ,

Top 5 Predictions on Cloud Computing for 2012

December 31st, 2011 4 comments

After finishing up my reflection of 2011 predictions , it’s time to make my predictions for 2012 as today is the last day of 2011. :-)

1. Virtualization war will be heated between VMware and Microsoft. The trigger will be the Hyper-V 3.0 which is expected to ship in the middle of 2012 with the Windows 8 server. According to many people, the 3.0 release will bring it on par or better than latest VMware hypervisor.

Reflection on My Predictions on Cloud Computing for 2011

December 27th, 2011 No comments

Last December I made top 5 predictions on cloud computing for 2011. When the year ends soon, it’s time to review them. I won’t rate their accuracy myself because I am indeed biased. You are welcome to do so in the comments though.

“1. The focus of cloud computing will gradually shift from IaaS to PaaS which becomes key differentiator in competition. Developer enablement becomes more important than ever in ecosystem evangelism, full software lifecycle integration, IDE support, API and framework, and etc.”

Book: The Art of Scalability

December 5th, 2011 5 comments

Just finished reading the book The Art of Scalability: Scalable Web Architecture, Processes, and Organizations for the Modern Enterprise by Martin Abbott, Michael Fisher. The book draws on authors’ experiences working at PayPal/eBay and other Internet companies, and covers many aspects of scalability including people, organization, process, and technology. According to Yishan Wong, who used to work under the authors and is now an engineering director at Facebook, “the opportunity to directly absorb the lessons and experiences presented in this book is invaluable to me now working at Facebook.”

Categories: Cloud Computing Tags: , ,

New Book: Enterprise Java Applications Architecture on VMware

November 4th, 2011 5 comments

My former colleague Emad Benjamin at VMware has just published a new book on running Java on vSphere. When I was still there, I had the opportunity to review the Chapter 5 of his book.

As many of you know, Emad is a well-known expert on this subject who has spoken at various events like VMworld and helped numerous customers. You can buy his book at Amazon or from publisher directly. Remember to bring it to next year’s VMworld for his autograph.:-)

Best Practices for Best Practices

November 2nd, 2011 No comments

Like many other industries, IT industry has all sort of best practices, from how to use a product to how to design software. I have personally contributed top 10 best practices on how to use VMware vSphere APIs (part 1, part 2).

Given the complexity of IT systems, it makes sense to capture the expert knowledge in the format of best practices. I think there are just too many of them and not all of them are of high qualities, thus I have a mixed feeling about best practices these days.

Learning Microsoft Windows Azure Cloud

October 29th, 2011 2 comments

Yesterday I went to Microsoft Azure DevCamp in its Silicon Valley office. Like other developer events organized by Microsoft, it featured awesome presentations with nice overviews and demos by top evangelists like James Conard, Wade Wegner, Nick Harris, etc.

As you’ve probably known, Microsoft has been betting heavily on cloud computing. Anyone who is interested in cloud computing simply cannot ignore its Windows Azure, which is a comprehensive platform for developing cloud applications. Note that, the focus is applications, not virtual machines as offered by Amazon and other IaaS providers.

Diversified Devices Plus Cloud Data: Future of Client Computing

September 21st, 2011 No comments

In my previous articles, I mainly cover server virtualization and cloud computing. Client computing, although less enterprise focused, is also a very important part of whole story. In this article, I am going to share some thoughts on this topic, mostly about the future development of how users will use computers and what it takes to get there. I know it’s a big topic, but let’s give a try.