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VMware PEX 2010 Kicks Off Today In The Cloudy Las Vegas

February 8th, 2010 No comments

Today is the first day of VMware Partner Exchange. According to a company news,

VMware Partner Exchange 2010 Kicks Off With Record-breaking 2,600+ Attendees, 55 Sponsors and 45 Countries Represented

Third Annual Event Grows More than 60 Percent Year over Year; VMware Continues to Invest in Solution Competencies, Partner University and Education to Help Partners Deliver Virtualization Solutions to Customers on the Journey to Cloud Computing

Categories: News & Events Tags:

Can You Express Your Love With VMware For Valentine’s Day?

February 7th, 2010 No comments

While reading my personal emails today, I also checked the spam folder. One email title caught my eyes instantly, “Express Your Love with A Domain Name.” That sounds like an interesting idea for techies.

Following the lead, I was thinking what VMware can offer to help you to express your love. Obviously VMware has done far more than expressing. According to our CTO Steve Herrod, VMware VMotion had saved 74 marriages by the time of his keynote at VMworld 2009 (32’35”). I bet the number is even more today.

With that statistical in mind, one quick solution is the VMotion and DRS which balance the computing workload, also your work and life I suppose. It’s great but only for the system administrators who have access to vSphere and VMware Infrastructure. For other people, it’s not that practical.

Luckily, VMware is not only about business, but also about personal. Here are several ideas you can consider for this coming Valentine’s day:

Categories: News & Events Tags:

Automatically Generate Your Java Code With Onyx?

February 6th, 2010 2 comments

During last Friday VMware beer bash, I bumped into Carter Shanklin. He told me he’s ready show off how his Onyx project can help Java developers using VI Java API at Partner Exchange next week in Las Vegas. If you will be there, be sure to attend his session TEXIBP1007 – also known as “Getting Stoned with ‘Project Onyx’” on Thursday at 11:30.

The Mythical Sessions in vSphere and VI

February 5th, 2010 7 comments

In my previous blogs, I talked about session management for scalability and best practices (#9). In this one, I am going to drill down to the bottom.

To your surprises, there are two types of sessions involved in vSphere SDK:

  • HTTP Session. It’s used to identify a client and tracked by the cookie in HTTP header. Once you login the server, all the successive requests have to carry the cookie header similar as follows

vmware_soap_session=”5229c547-1342-47d1-e830-223d99a47fba”

  • User Session. It’s used to identify a login session of a particular user. You can use SessionManager to find out more the details of the current user and other login users from the UserSession data object. The key in the UserSession is in the same format as the HTTP session, but you should never confuse them, or use them interchangeably.

4 Ways to WIN $2,500 Prize With vSphere Java API

February 4th, 2010 3 comments

You may have read blogs from my colleagues Mike DiPetrillo, Duncan Epping about the VMware Script-O-Mania contest. The prizes are $2,500 (1st), $1,000 (2nd), and $500(3rd) respectively. The contest ends in March 15, 2010. So act quickly!

“Wait, how can I WIN the prizes?”

Well, first of all, you want to read carefully the criteria. Note that your script is for System Administrators with ESXi. So it could be for initial server set up, health monitoring, trouble shooting, reporting auditing, or anything else that is cool and creative. I suggest you talk to system administrators what REAL PAINS they have, and how they would like to fix the problems.

When you are clear what problems to solve, then let’s move on.

If you are already familiar with PowerCLI and RCLI, you should probably stick with them. You can get helps from VMware Developer Community.

If not, open source VI Java API can help you!

Here are 4 ways the API can do for you to win the $2,500:

Introducing A Tiny Yet Powerful API to Manage and Automate vSphere

February 3rd, 2010 8 comments

In yesterday’s blog, I talked about a little known secret of vSphere MOB – the invisible embedded XML in the HTML pages. To take advantage of the secret, I created a client side REST API which was shipped in VI Java API 2.0.

A Little Known Secret of vSphere Managed Object Browser

February 2nd, 2010 6 comments

secretMost VI SDK developers know Managed Object Browser (MOB), and mostly have used it for better understanding of the SDK, or assisting programming and debugging. In my opinion, it’s a must-have  tool for every vSphere SDK developer.

It’s extremely helpful if you want to figure out the inventory path of certain managed entities. The vSphere Client shows you different paths which don’t work with the SearchIndex and others. Nothing wrong with vSphere Client – it just tries to display information in a way that is easier to understand by the system administrators.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , ,

CO2: The Formula For A Successful Developer Ecosystem

February 1st, 2010 No comments

Since joining VMware two and half years ago, I have been working like a consultant on partner enablement projects in various technical areas like SDK, SRM array adapter, VI Client plug-in, DRS clustering, etc. While working on these engagements, I always think about more efficient and more effective ways to get my work done and grow our developer ecosystem.

To summarize what I learned and thought, I decide to use CO2 as the success formula because it fits well when we talk about an ecosystem. The CO2 here means differently though. It represents Cash + Open source + Open communication.

Common Mistakes Using VMware VI and vSphere SDK

January 31st, 2010 2 comments

I posted two blogs on the top 10 best practices of using the vSphere SDK (part 1, part 2) two days ago. Here is a list of several common mistakes developers make during their development. It’s based on the stats from our SDK support team.

  1. Defining wrong interval information in PerfQuerySpec
  2. Using same unit number for each device attached to a controller
  3. Mistakes in defining the TraversalSpec
  4. Using case sensitive DNS names or IP address

Event: SF Cloud Computing Club Meetup on Mar 16

January 30th, 2010 No comments

Got an invitation email from my colleague Jame Watters who is the organizer of the SF Cloud Computing Club. This is the 4th of a very successful series of meet-ups for cloud professionals to network and brain storm new ideas.

I just registered the event, no nice portrait yet. If you are in bay area, it’s highly recommended.

What: SF Cloud Club Part 4: The great Cloud Connect Gathering! (By special request)
When: Tuesday, March 16, 2010 7:00 PM
Where: (A location has not been chosen yet.)
How: http://www.meetup.com/SF-Cloud-Computing-Club/calendar/12455606/

Top 10 Best Practices Using VMware VI and vSphere SDK (part 2)

January 29th, 2010 6 comments

#6 Consider Views in Your GUI Application

Most developers don’t know much about the View and related managed objects. The reason for that is that they were mainly designed for VI/vSphere Client in the first place. But nothing stops you from using it to your advantages.

As you can imagine, you can use the View and its subtypes InventoryView, ListView, and ContainerView to monitor changes on the server side. It provides an efficient way to monitor for changes with only these visible in your GUI and nothing more. You can use ViewManager to create views according to your specific needs.

Top 10 Best Practices Using VMware VI and vSphere SDK (part 1)

January 28th, 2010 2 comments

VMware vSphere (as known as VI in earlier versions) SDK includes a comprehensive set of APIs managing the vSphere CloudOS. It can be used to build different types of applications: standalone GUI applications, vSphere Client plug-in, utility tools, Web applications, server applications. It is becoming increasingly important as more and more enterprises become 100% virtualized with vSphere.

Get your hands dirty with self paced labs at PEX 2010

January 28th, 2010 2 comments

Besides the talks on VMware APIs, two self paced labs are there for you to try out the vSphere SDK and PowerShell at PEX. More details are quoted in later part.

As a bonus, you will get a chance to learn VI Java API in the SDK lab. Thanks to VMware TAM Alton Yu for making this happen! I will be there when I am not presenting my talk “Architecting Your Applications for VMware Cloud”, or helping on the BOF, genius bar, etc.

How does LinkedIn.com do the search?

January 28th, 2010 No comments

Search has been a hot topic since Google successfully monetized it with advertising business model. Besides general Web content search like Google does, there are many other types of searches needed for other Internet companies.

LinkedIn.com, with which most of us have created profiles, offers search capabilities based criteria like keywords, names, location, industry, companies currently with and before, school, etc. Because what Linkedin.com has is well structured data, you and I expect it to do a better job than Web searches. In fact, it does.

What else do you want from next release of VI Java API?

January 27th, 2010 2 comments

After we released VI Java 2.0 GA for about half year, it’s about time to plan for the next release. My current plan is to have a synchronized release with next major release of vSphere. Therefore the must-have feature is to support next vSphere.

On top of that, here are several things we most likely do as well:

My contribution mentioned in VMware news release

January 26th, 2010 2 comments

Last week VMware released a news “VMware Expands VMware vCloud Developer Ecosystem With Open-Source Java and Python SDKs for VMware vCloud API”. It says,

VMware has also made a number of open-source contributions to the Cloud Tools project, which powers the SpringSource Cloud Foundry service, enabling Java developers to deploy, test, and manage applications for VMware environments via VMware vSphere(TM) and the VMware vCloud API.

Why does C# Web Service code look weird?

January 25th, 2010 No comments

Today I read a posting at VMware community forum about the weird code required by C# Web Service. If the following line is missing, then the vSphere API call to get properties doesn’t work:

VimApi.VimService.PropertySpec.allSpecified = True 

But the problem is that there isn’t any property defined as allSpecified in the object PropertySpec according to vSphere API Reference.

So, where does the allSpecified come from? and why is it needed?

Tips on session management for scaling your server applications to vSphere

January 24th, 2010 2 comments

Our business team invited me to a phone call with one of our strategic partners days ago. They had a scalability issue with their server application. It turned out to be related to session management. I think they are not the only one who got into this type of problems, and most likely not the last one. So I decide to share it and hopefully you can avoid similar problems in your projects.

In or For the Cloud? A big difference made for your applications

January 23rd, 2010 No comments

Many folks mentioned their presentations for VMware Partner Exchange in Las Vegas next month. Let me share mine here.

As you migth have guessed from the blog title, the presentation has a lot to do with both the cloud and application. My presentation title is “Architecting your applications for VMware Cloud.” I will discuss the challenges and opportunities the cloud brings in for application development, especially for the application architecture, and more importantly how to get it done.

Why DoubleCloud? The mission statement in short

January 21st, 2010 No comments

After setting up this blog site, I updated my LinkedIn profile. This morning, my colleague Gilbert left me a comment saying “why not hybrid cloud?” I know he was kidding, but it’s a good time to explain why I got this name.

The basic idea behind the name is the following equation:

DoubleCloud = PublicCloud + PrivateCloud

or as some people prefer

DoubleCloud = ExternalCloud + InternalCloud