Archive

Archive for September, 2012

XML APIs to Manage Cisco Nexus 1000V

September 30th, 2012 5 comments

If you’ve been following my blog, you may remember I wrote Cisco Nexus 1000V in VMware vSphere API about half year ago. The Cisco Nexus 1000V actually has another APIs based on XML. Interestingly, it’s implemented over SSH, but not HTTP or HTTPS.

The Nexus 1000V APIs follows two ITEF standards: RFC 4741 NETCONF Configuration Protocol, and RFC 4742 Using the NETCONF Configuration Protocol over Secure SHell (SSH). The first one is pretty long with close to 100 pages, but fortunately Wikipedia has a much shorter introduction. The RFC 4742 is just 8 pages and pretty easy to browse through.

Categories: Virtualization Tags: ,

Hadoop File System Commands

September 26th, 2012 4 comments

I just took a Hadoop developer training in the week of September 10. To me, Hadoop is not totally new as I’ve tried HelloWorld sample and Serengeti project. Still, I found it’s nice to get away from daily job and go through a series of lectures and hands-on labs in a training setting. Believe it or not, I felt more tired after training than a typical working day. This post is not much new but just helps me on the commands when needed later.

Categories: Big Data Tags: , ,

Announcing Public Beta of VI Java API 5.1 Supporting vSphere 5.1

September 23rd, 2012 6 comments

After VMware released the vSphere 5.1 on the night of September 10, I finally got a chance to look at the new vSphere API, including the API reference and more important to me the WSDL files.

I was relieved to find out that there weren’t many changes. No single managed object is added to the vSphere 5.1 API, meaning a lot less work than I thought for vijava API to support the latest vSphere 5.1.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

Converged Infrastructure and Object Oriented Programming

September 10th, 2012 1 comment

At first sight, these two technologies are totally different and you won’t talk about them together. But looking closely at the philosophies behind them, I find they are surprisingly similar and I hope you would agree with me after reading through this article.

A Quick Overview

Before getting into the detailed analysis, let’s take a quick look at the concepts and histories of both technologies.

Behind vRAM – What’s VMware’s Deepest Fear?

September 5th, 2012 4 comments

The vRAM was the license model VMware used in vSphere 5.0. It basically limits the usage of virtual memory, which is different from physical memory, per license. When first announced last year, it created a lot of angry customers overnight even though VMware estimated that the license scheme wouldn’t affect most of the existing customers. Later on, VMware doubled the amount of virtual memory and implemented a cap per license, and insisted to roll out the modified license model despite strong objections from customers.