Monthly Archives: July 2012

What VMware Didn’t Tell You About Nicira Deal

On this past Monday VMware announced to buy Nicira for $1.26 billion. Congratulations to many of my former VMware colleagues who joined Nicira and will return back to VMware soon.

Overall this deal aligns well with VMware’s newly found vision on software defined data center. You must have read many of similar explanations and comments from various sources including this one from VMware CTO Steve Herrod, and this one by Nicira cofounder and CTO Martin Casado.

Posted in Cloud Computing, News & Events, Virtualization | Tagged , , , | 7 Responses

Hadoop vs. Tomcat

In my previous article, I talked about three different ways enterprises use Hadoop. Thinking a bit more, you may have come to realize that the three usage patterns are very similar to how we use Tomcat. I will compare these two for commonalities and differences.

First of all, both Hadoop and Tomcat are Java based open source projects from Apache Foundation, thus copyrighted by the same Apache license. As a result, you can freely use Hadoop in the same way as you have used Tomcat in terms of license compliance.

Posted in Big Data | Tagged , , | 2 Responses

Will Enterprise Hardware Be Hot Again?

BusinessWeek recently published an article “In Silicon Valley, Hardware is Hot Again.” Almost all big names started to sell hardware now, Microsoft, Google, and Apple of course. Apple’s stellar success in iPhone and iPad disrupted the conventional wisdom that software is higher in margin compared to hardware. Also, Apple’s hardware and software combined devices posts a real risk for Microsoft and Google. To be exact, the hardware in the article title should really be software bundled hardware. That is why Google and Microsoft had to get into hardware business competing directly against Apple.

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VMware Serengeti: A Perfect Match of Hadoop and vSphere

During the Hadoop Summit 2012 last month, I learned the release of the open source (Apache license) Serengeti project from VMware. The week after, I downloaded the OVA file from VMware site, and gave my first try with a development environment after browsing through the user guide which introduces a fairly easy process to get a Hadoop cluster to run on vSphere.

Posted in Big Data, Virtualization | Tagged , | 1 Response

Hack Workspace in Netbeans IDE

As a long time Eclipse user, I like its workspace concept and the ease of switching workspaces among many other things. The workspace provides a simple yet powerful way to isolate groups of projects into different workspaces under different folders, so you’re not distracted by other un-related projects.

This feature is, however, not available in Netbeans IDE, which is not a big deal most of time. By default, the Netbeans IDE creates a folder under current user’s home directory as follows (yours could be different):

Posted in Software Development | Tagged , | 7 Responses

Three Ways Enterprises Can Use Hadoop

Hadoop has recently gained lots of attentions from enterprises. Just think about the rapid growth of attendees in Hadoop Summit. There are many different ways to leverage Hadoop in enterprises. But in general, there are three major types of usage patterns as detailed below.

As a Framework

This is what Hadoop was initially intended to be, and continues to be one of the major approaches in the short term. It means that an enterprise needs to invest in customized application development, which normally costs more than out of shelf applications.

Posted in Big Data | Tagged , | 1 Response

What Hadoop Community Can Learn From VMware Virtualization

As I mentioned in a previous article, Hadoop is in a similar stage as virtualization 10 years ago – the technology is mostly ready for wider adoption. There were certain secret sauces leading to virtualization’s stellar success, especially VMware in the enterprise space. Here I examine some of these success factors that could be learned by Hadoop community.

Strive For Out Of Box Experience

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Is MapReduce A Major Step Backwards?

While learning Hadoop, I was wondering whether the MapReduce processing model that can handle all the Big Data challenges. David DeWitt and Michael Stonebrakeer took a step further by arguing MapReduce is a major step backwards in their blog article. I found it’s a very good reading but not necessarily agree with the authors. It’s always good to know different opinions and the contexts where they come from. I also found the authors wrote the best introduction of MapReduce in several short paragraphs. I quote them in the end, so read on.

Posted in Big Data | Tagged , | 3 Responses

MapReduce: The Theory Behind Hadoop

As most of us know, Hadoop is a Java implementation of the MapReduce processing model originated from Google by Jeffrey Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat. After studying Hadoop and attending several related events(Hadoop Summit, Hadoop for Enterprise by Churchill Club), I felt I should dig deeper by reading the original paper.

The paper is titled “MapReduce: Simplified Data Processing on Large Clusters.” Unlike most research papers I’ve read before, it’s written in plain English and fairly easy to read and follow. I find it really worthwhile reading and strongly recommend you spend an hour to read through it.

Posted in Big Data | Tagged , | 2 Responses

Review Board Virtual Machine for Code Review: The Missing Manual

Code review is important for the quality of a software product. It used to be a meeting activity where a small group of engineers walk through changes and provide the author feedbacks. This is highly effective but not flexible enough, especially when there are frequent code changes.

Posted in Software Development | Tagged , , | 1 Response

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    Me: Steve Jin, VMware vExpert who authored the VMware VI and vSphere SDK by Prentice Hall, and created the de factor open source vSphere Java API while working at VMware engineering. Companies like Cisco, EMC, NetApp, HP, Dell, VMware, are among the users of the API and other tools I developed for their products, internal IT orchestration, and test automation.