Monthly Archives: December 2010

Top 5 Predictions on Cloud Computing for 2011

While 2011 is coming soon, many technologists and medias are busy with predictions for 2011. I got an email from the chief of Cloud Computing Journal Jeremy Geelan (@jg21) for my predictions. Here are my thoughts on the cloud computing for 2011 and beyond:

  1. The focus of cloud computing will gradually shift from IaaS to PaaS which becomes key differentiator in competition. Developer enablement becomes more important than ever in ecosystem evangelism, full software lifecycle integration, IDE support, API and framework, and etc.
  2. Many more mergers and acquisitions (M&As) will take place in cloud space for companies to build stronger cloud portfolio. For big players, it should include dual vertically complete stacks both as services and products. Whoever gets there first will gain enormous advantages over its competitors.
Posted in Cloud Computing | Tagged , , , , | 3 Responses

Join Me at Partner Exchange 2011

VMware Partner Exchange takes place twice a year. One happens at the same time/location with VMworld US; the other in places like Las Vegas, Orlando. It’s a dedicated conference to educating and enabling partners for success with VMware. It has merged with Technology Exchange where you can find many technical presentations. I have been speaking at TechnologyExchange since I joined VMware in 2007. Here is the related articles I wrote earlier.

The coming ParterExchange will be in Orlando FL from Feb 7 to 11. Please join us to hear VMware’s plans for the coming year, learn of new technologies and partner programs, and understand the training roadmap. Here is the content catalog with all the sessions. Don’t forget the famous hands-on labs throughout the week. I will talk about securing vSphere infrastructure with vSphere API.

Posted in News & Events, Virtualization | Tagged , , | 2 Responses

Open Source In Action: Open Source Projects from VMware

As a leading edge software company, VMware has a long history of support for open source software in its products. It also contributes back many patches and projects to the open source community including the vijava API that I created. With SpringSource and Zimbra acquisitions, more open source projects are associated with VMware brand.

Here is a list of 10 home grown open source projects from VMware. Please feel free to click links for more details and play with them.

1. Dr. Memory. It’s “a memory monitoring tool capable of identifying memory-related programming errors such as accesses of uninitialized memory, accesses to unaddressable memory (including outside of allocated heap units and heap underflow and overflow), accesses to freed memory, double frees, memory leaks, and (on Windows) access to un-reserved thread local storage slots.”

2. Virtual USB Analyzer. A “free and open source tool for visualizing logs of USB packets, from hardware or software USB sniffer tools. As far as we know, it’s the world’s first tool to provide a graphical visualization along with raw hex dumps and high-level protocol analysis.”

Posted in Software Development, Virtualization | Tagged , | 2 Responses

Cloud Architecture Patterns: Service VM


Provide an easy way to provision new infrastructure and application services for a computing cloud




To run a large-scale computing infrastructure, you will need many different types of services, including compute, storage, and networking, among others. After virtualization has successfully detached compute from the physical hardware, it’s very easy to provision and scale compute. But compute requires storage and networking which are lagging behind. To maximize the benefits of virtualization and cloud computing, it’s natural to push the storage and networking in the same direction.

Looking beyond the infrastructure to consider applications, we need various types of services such as database, directory, messaging, and more. I’ve covered the App VM pattern that allows using IaaS for PaaS in a previous blog. While you can pack some of these services into an application VM, the problem is that it scales well but does not follow the aspectual centralization pattern.


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Must Knows About Release Engineering: Lessons From Google

This is yet another post based on my notes taken at LISA 2010 conference. The talk is The 10 commandments in release engineering by Dinah McNutt from Google. Dinah did a great job in summarizing the basics of release engineering therefore it’s worthwhile to compile my note and share it here.

Note that although typical release engineering does not produce virtual appliances, the basic principles are the same. You will find these basics helpful as well.

Release engineering is a critical part of software engineering and should be treated as products in their own rights. But often there is disconnect between development writing the code and the system administrator who installs it. Release process is usually an afterthought.

Typical Release Process

The following steps are executed during a release run:

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From Developer to Devops: What System Administration Skills Should You Know?

With the rising trend of devops movement, I was curious about the system administration from a software developer’s perspective. That’s why I sat through Adam Moskowitz’s session “The Path to Senior Sysadmin.” Adam summarized the system administrator’s skills to three categories: hard tech skills, squishy tech sill, and software skills as detailed in following. Again, this is based on my note taken from LISA 2010 conference. For other posts related to the conference, check here.

Hard Tech Skills

  • All the commands for system administration;
  • System backup;
  • Some programming skills like Shell scripting, Perl/Python, C (read);
  • Software engineering knowledge like versioning, process;
Posted in Software Development | Tagged , , , | 3 Responses

Cloud Architecture Patterns: VM Pipeline


Provide a configurable structure for modularized information processing




Complicated data processing involves many distinctive and repetitive steps. Each of these steps can be mapped to a software module that is independently developed and assembled for particular cases of data processing.

Given the elastic nature of cloud computing, it’s a perfect platform for data processing. We need a solution that is flexible in two ways:

1.     Modularized components for data processing;

2.     Configurable so that different modules can be re-used easily in various cases.


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Gadget Talk: What Are the Newest and Most Innovative Gadgets?

I attended SDForum emerging technology SIG meeting on Wednesday night I. It’s about cool gadgets by award winning tech journalist and entrepreneur Fred Davis, who was part of Weird, CNET, Ask Jeeves, Ziff-Davis publishing on PC Magazine, PC Week, MacUser, A+. The following are gadgets Fred talked about in his presentation. It’s based on my note which may not be accurate. Hopefully it gives ideas what to buy for the holidays.

  1. iPod Touch. It’s like an iPhone but no phone support. You can use Skype with WIFI however. Price: $189 with 8G
  2. iPod Nano. Small music player with price about $139.
  3. iPod Shuffle. Smallest music player in the iPod family. Price: $49
  4. iPad. This is hottest consumer devices that created a record on fastest adoption. Price: $499
  5. iPad keyboard/wireless keyboard.
  6. Kindle Wifi 3G. It’s an e-book reader from Amazon. Compared with other readers or general purpose devices, it comes with no color but best selection of books and digital right management. $189
  7. MiFi 2200 mobile hotspot. It uses Verizon 3G to provide wireless connection to 5 WIFI enabled devices. Price: $269 and could be cheaper with iPad bundle.
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How Twitter Operates Its IT infrastructure: From Process to Tools

This post is based on my notes taken at the talk by John Adams at LISA 2010 conference. Any mistakes, if any, are all mine. Should you be interested in other sites, check out Google, Facebook, LinkedIn.

As one of the leading social Web site with 165M users, Twitter demands a huge infrastructure support its operation. There are 700M searches and 1,000 tweets per second and can go up to almost 4,000 at peak. The number of tweets is not that impressive, but these tweets need to be distributed to numerous followers which could be several millions after one account.

These days Twitter gets 75% traffic from API and 25% from the Web. The new Web interface heavily uses AJAX and acts as API client to its backend.

As John put it, “nothing works the first time.” His recommendation is to use the best available technology for scaling. You will need to plan and build for more than one time to get it right.

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Squares Aren’t Rectangles? A Common Misunderstanding of Object Oriented Design From MSDN Magazine

While reading the recent Dec 2010 issue of MSDN magazine, I found an article (Multiparadigmatic .Net, Part 4: Object Orientation) with misunderstandings on object oriented design. I was surprised that the author reached conclusions like, “squares aren’t rectangles,” and “no happy ending here.” The conclusions are based on misunderstandings of object oriented design.

Let me show you what the root problem is and how to get a happy ending. After reading this, you won’t be bothered by “squares aren’t rectangles.”

What’s the problem?

As most people already know, inheritance or generalization (I prefer the latter) is an important feature of OOD. Using it effectively can lead to a good object model and concise codebase. In an inheritance relationship, a subtype must maintain “IS-A” relationship with its super type, for example, a Student type IS-A Person. I think most people are just fine with this.

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vSphere Performance Counters for Monitoring ESX and vCenter

VMware vSphere provides comprehensive performance metrics for your needs on performance monitoring and diagnosis. These stats are available through not only vSphere Client but also vSphere APIs. To understand the overall performance management concepts, you want to read this article: Fundamentals of vSphere Performance Management.
Once having the basics, you may wonder what types of stats are exposed. The following table summaries all the 315 performance counters available in vSphere 4.1. As you might have guessed, the information is generated using open source Sphere Java API and then imported into WordPress using WP-Table Reloaded. You can easily sort and search the table.

Update: Carter Shanklin and Luc Dekens have articles on performance counters as well:

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , , , , , , | 11 Responses

    My company has created products like vSearch ("Super vCenter"), vijavaNG APIs, EAM APIs, ICE tool. We also help clients with virtualization and cloud computing on customized development, training. Should you, or someone you know, need these products and services, please feel free to contact me: steve __AT__

    Me: Steve Jin, VMware vExpert who authored the VMware VI and vSphere SDK by Prentice Hall, and created the de factor open source vSphere Java API while working at VMware engineering. Companies like Cisco, EMC, NetApp, HP, Dell, VMware, are among the users of the API and other tools I developed for their products, internal IT orchestration, and test automation.