Monthly Archives: August 2010

Ruby to Manage and Automate VMware vSphere?

As I mentioned in a previous blog, vSphere(VI) Java API can be used in any JVM languages/frameworks. We have samples in Jython, Groovy, Grail. This weekend I got a sample in JRuby shared by our community member Martin Jackson in the API forum. Thanks Martin!

I think it would be fun to share it with you. If you can write Ruby code, you can take advantage of VI Java API for managing and automating vSphere as well. If you have samples leveraging the API to share, I am happy to hear about it.

Now, let us take a look at Martin’s sample code ported from a VI Java API sample.

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Eclipse Day at GooglePlex: A Brief Trip Report

I attended Eclipse Day at Google headquarter today. It’s a great event packed with several great talks.

Mobile application is for sure a hot topic these days. There were several talks on mobile application development like Android Tools for Eclipse by Xavier Ducrohet from Google, Eclipse Sequoyah for Android App Developers by Eric Cloninger from Motorola, Tools for Mobile Web by Paul Beusterien from Symbian Foundation, and EMF for GWT by Ed Merks from Cloudsmith.

While sitting in the talk on Instantiations Eclipse Tools, I learned that Google bought the company 3 weeks ago. I expect Google will soon make WindowsBuilder, a famous WYSIWYG GUI authoring tool, free for GWT users, therefore further drive the adoption of GWT in competition with Flex, SilverLight.

Posted in News & Events, Software Development | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Response

vSphere Java API 3.0 Kicks off, code name “Crescendo”

WIth 2.1 GAed yesterday, I am happy to announce the 3.0 project kicks off officially. For more fun, I picked up a code name for 3.0 release: Crescendo. For folks know music, crescendo means music gets louder and louder. That is where I want to bring the project to. It’s been a huge success for this VMware sponsored open source project. We’ve had 9,000+ downloads, plus 1000+ SVN code sync, after its first debut in 2008.

So where are we going next?

Before answering the question, let’s take a look at the themes of previous releases. The theme of 1.0 was ease of use with full object model and getter methods hiding property collector. The theme of 2.0 was Just Enough High Performance Web Service Engine resulted in not only performance boost, but also clean license with pure BSD, and much smaller footprint and zero memory leak.

Now it’s time to re-visit ease of use again, but from a different perspective. As I discussed early, the learning curve of vSphere API comes from two folds: lack of object model, and complexity of data objects. The 1.0 release solved the problem nicely. Now it’s time to tackle the second one.

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged | 11 Responses

Announcing vSphere Java API 2.1 GA Release

Right after vSphere 4.1 released, VI Java API 2.1 beta supporting vSphere 4.1 was released on July 15. After 40 days, I am pleased to announce GA of the 2.1 release. Many thanks to all vijava community memembers who helped to try 2.1 beta and give feedbacks.

The 2.1 beta is pretty good in terms of quality. I got several emails reporting greeen. I did get several bugs, some of which are carry-overs that should have been fixed in previous releases. Check the end of this blog for a list of bug fixes.

During the beta period, I started a poweredby page which now features 10 companies/products which use vijava API. If you would like your organizations/products included, please let me know.

Enough being said, are you ready to give 2.1 a try? Please feel to download it here. Even you are new to this API, 5 minutes is good enough to have your first HelloVSphere running with this tutorial.

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , | 10 Responses

Tipping points: the Social Aspect of Cloud Computing

Many people already know the book “The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.” According to the author Malcolm Gladwell, tipping points are “the levels at which the momentum for change becomes unstoppable.” He defines the term as sociological and uses it to explain sociological epidemics.

Three Rules of Epidemics

In his book, Gladwell laid out the “three rules of epidemics” as follows:

1) The Law of the Few.
“The success of any kind of social epidemic is heavily dependent on the involvement of people with a particular and rare set of social gifts.” The author categorized people into Connectors who link us up with the world; Mavens who are “people we rely upon to connect us with new information;” and Salesmen who are charismatic persuaders.

2) The Stickiness Factor
The specific content of a message that renders its impact memorable.

3) The Power of Context
Human behavior is sensitive to and strongly influenced by its environment.

Although the research comes from sociology, I think it applies to technology as well. After all, technology is social. Just think about social networks like Facebook, and the recent success of Apple’s iPad.

If you want your technology to be a huge success, you cannot ignore its social side story. In the end, it is human beings who make decisions regarding any technology adoption or product purchase.

Posted in Cloud Computing | Tagged , | 2 Responses

Secret of vApp Template in vSphere

My colleagues and I had a discussion regarding the vApp template. After virtual machine template for virtual machine, you would expect vApp template for vApp and manage it in a similar way from the vSphere Client. But you cannot.

Most of us know that from vSphere Client, you have context menu item allowing you to convert a virtual machine to a template easily with a click. However you cannot find a similar menu item with a vApp. You can choose to convert a virtual machine inside a vApp, but then the converted template will jump out of the vApp container.

Can we have vApp template? The answer is we can, but in a different way.

Posted in Virtualization, vSphere API | Tagged , , , | 2 Responses

Restriction with User Name in ESX 4.1

According to a recent post by Duncan, there is an issue with password in ESX(i) 4.1. Only the first 8 characters of a password are taken and validated. A VMware KB article offered solutions to this issue.

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , , | 2 Responses

How to Get Event Type with vSphere API?

There is a recent question asking how to get the type of event from vSphere API in my previous blog. On one hand, you can clearly see the types of events on a vSphere Client, for instance “info”, “warning”, “error”, and “user.” On the other hand, you cannot find any information about the type from a given event itself using vSphere API.

Strictly speaking an event just indicates something has happened. That is it. You can categorize it differently depending on your goal. The Event type itself in vSphere API models an event as what it is, not about how you look at it. This is a right design philosophy, but turns out to be a little tricky for you to figure out the type of an event.

How does vSphere Client do the trick?

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , , | 9 Responses

InterCloud vs. Internet: What’s Missing in Cloud Computing?

As more and more clouds go live, it’s time to think about how they will need to interconnect and interact. InterCloud is a new terminology coined for cloud computing after Internet for networking.

Vint Cerf, the “father” of the Internet, said recently that the cloud is much like networking in 1973 when computer networks couldn’t connect or interact. He called for open standards for cloud computing so that InterCloud can become a reality.

It’s hard to design standards when people are still trying to reach a consensus on defining what a cloud is in the first place! The good news is that as an industry we went through a similar process for the Internet. So we can learn from that experience.

The idea is simple: look at basic building blocks we have for the Internet and think about their equivalent for the InterCloud. Believe it or not, InterCloud and Internet share many common characteristics. The following table summarizes some of these.

Posted in Cloud Computing | Tagged , , , | 3 Responses

Manage Lockdown Mode with New API in vSphere 4.1

As a feature, lockdown mode has been added to vSphere 4.0 . Enabling it disables all remote root access to an ESXi machine. Any local changes to the host must be using:

  • DCUI (Direct Console User Interface).
  • vSphere Client or vCLI connecting to vCenter.
  • vSphere Client or vCLI connecting to ESXi with a local user account on the host.

My colleague Duncan Epping has summarized a table showing whether you can change ESXi with different access methods in two modes.

As a general practice for better security, it’s recommended to enable lockdown mode. However the lockdown mode could be breached by adding root user to local groups,

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How to Get ESX Version from vCenter?

There is a recent question in vSphere(VI) Java API forum about this. On its face, it’s very easy because most people know how to get hold of the version as follows: 

String version = si.getAboutInfo().getVersion();

The si in the above code is the variable of ServiceInstance object. If you have never used the API yet, please try this Getting Started Tutorial which shows how to get your first program running from scratch in 5 minutes

If you are connecting to a vCenter server and try to get the version of a HostSystem the vCenter manages, it’s not so obvious. But it’s definitely doable. Here is the solution assuming you already get hold of the HostSystem object as host variable here: 

String version = host.getConfig().getProduct().getVersion();

Here you know why. First, the aboutInfo is now called product although they are of the same type. Second, it’s hidden within the config property. 

Before taking the code away, I would like to share with you an important tip for better performance. 

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , | 4 Responses

UUID vs. vSphere

UUID stands for universally unique identifier (UUID). It’s a 128-bit value. vSphere uses it as IDs for many different types of entities like HostSystem, VirtualMachine, Datastore, etc.

The UUID surfaces to the vSphere API as well. You can find many methods use UUID as parameter or return result. The most commonly used one is the SearchIndex.findByUuid() which find you a virtual machine or a host based on its UUID, either instance or BIOS UUID. The format used for UUID is as follows:


Since 4.0, DistributedVirtualSwitchManager managed object is added and it has a method called queryDvsByUuid(). As reported by VI Java API community, the standard format doesn’t work. The accepted format is like this:

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , , , | 4 Responses

Why Hyperic Chose VI Java API for vSphere Integration?

VMware SpringSource released Hyperic 4.4 last week. According to Charles Lee, co-founder of Hyperic, one key feature is “enhanced management of VMware virtualized environments through integration with VMware vCenter.” I am glad vSphere(VI) Java API (a.k.a. vijava) has contributed to the success of the product.

Here is part of Charles’s blog Hyperic Broadens vSphere Support through vCenter APIs in Version 4.4 explaining the rationale behind the choice:

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How to Promote a Virtual Machine’s Disks?

What does a promotion mean for a virtual machine’s disks? When you get a promotion, you may have more salary, a better title, bigger office space, etc. For sure a virtual disk cannot earn salary and doesn’t care about title, but it can occupy bigger space in datastore.

In my previous blog, I discussed how to create linked virtual machines using vSphere API. These linked virtual machines share a common disk as base, therefore the total disk consumption is significantly reduced. When a virtual disk is promoted, it gets its own “office” other than sharing it with others.

The vSphere API to promote virtual disks is promoteDisks_Task defined with VirtualMachine type. It has a tricky parameter called “unlink” (type: boolean) . According to the API reference:

1. If the unlink parameter is true, any disk backing which is shared shared by multiple virtual machines is copied so that this virtual machine has its own unshared version. Copied files always end up in the virtual machine’s home directory.

2. Any disk backing which is not shared between multiple virtual machines and is not associated with a snapshot is consolidated with its child backing.

Now when should you use true or false? “If the unlink parameter is true, the net effect of this operation is improved read performance, at the cost of disk space. If the unlink parameter is false the net effect is improved read performance at the cost of inhibiting future sharing.”

Here is the sample code that illustrates the usage of the API:

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Vertically Complete Systems: Next Big Trend?

IBM recently announced its re-organization around its software and hardware business units. The previously separate business units were merged together as one – the Systems and Software Group led by the former software chief Steve Mills.

You may recall that IBM did not have a dedicated software group until Lou Gerstner created one 15 years ago to centralize all the software businesses into one business unit. This unit has been IBM’s most profitable business. Before that, IBM offered all the software as add-ons to the systems like 390 and AS/400.

Now can we expect IBM to offer hardware systems as add-ons to their software solutions?

Although companies constantly re-organize to streamline their business execution, this reorganization did indicate a big trend is happening in the IT industry. Computer vendors are striving to own vertically-complete stacks: from hardware all the way up to business applications.

Posted in Cloud Computing, Virtualization | Tagged , | 3 Responses

A Big Cloud Challenge: Cross Stack Portability

When you think of portability in cloud computing, you think of how to move applications code, data, and workloads. These are mostly horizontal movements within the same level of software stacks – from one IaaS to another, and from one PaaS to another.

There is a more interesting and potentially very important movement that I would describe as “cross stack” portability. Today we don’t see cross stack portability unless we re-write the application, which is not what I cover here (although it could be a good business opportunity for companies to explore). Rather, I am talking about how to move your application built on PaaS to an IaaS vendor or even to a private cloud. The reason I call it cross stack is because the application is moved up or down to a different level in the software stack.

In this blog, I’ll focus on portability without code change. I’ll discuss three conversions: from PaaS to IaaS, SaaS to IaaS, and IaaS to PaaS. Mathematically we can have other forms of conversions – say from IaaS to SaaS – but those examples are either not that interesting or not that practical. So I won’t cover them here.

From PaaS to IaaS

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Who Created That VM: Java Version of the Winning Script of VMware Contest

As you recall from my previous blog on the Script-O-Mania contest, Alan Renouf won the first prize with his Who Created That VM script written in PowerCLI. The script leverages implicitly several vSphere APIs, so I think it would be cool to have a Java version. At least we can illustrate how to use these related vSphere APIs.

The following is a sample I rewote using VI Java API for the same purpose except that Alan’s script shows full display name of a user while this Java version shows user name (see the following diagram). Although longer, the Java version can run on any OS, not just Windows.

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , | 2 Responses

How to Create Linked Virtual Machines with vSphere API?

More often than not, you may have several virtual machines based on same software stacks running on the same host. Although they are very much the same, they take as much space as multitude of what one virtual machine takes.

Since vSphere 4.0, things are different. You can significantly reduce the storage usage by a new feature called linked virtual machines. The idea is simple: sharing a common virtual disk among the similar virtual machines. The shared virtual disk serves as a base. On top of that, each virtual machine has its own delta disk. When a guest operating system writes to disk, the data persists to the delta disk. When it reads from disk, the delta disk is checked first before trying the base disk.

As a result, you only need to save one copy of the base disk no matter how many virtual machines you have (up to 8 virtual machines in a linked virtual machine group). One limitation is that you cannot use it with HA cluster.

How to create linked virtual machines? You have two approaches: clone a virtual machine either from a snapshot, or from its current running state.

Posted in vSphere API | Tagged , , , | 16 Responses

    My company has created products like vSearch ("Super vCenter"), vijavaNG APIs, EAM APIs, ICE tool. We also help clients with virtualization and cloud computing on customized development, training. Should you, or someone you know, need these products and services, please feel free to contact me: steve __AT__

    Me: Steve Jin, VMware vExpert who authored the VMware VI and vSphere SDK by Prentice Hall, and created the de factor open source vSphere Java API while working at VMware engineering. Companies like Cisco, EMC, NetApp, HP, Dell, VMware, are among the users of the API and other tools I developed for their products, internal IT orchestration, and test automation.