Archive

Archive for March, 2010

Vote for vSphere Java API at VMware Labs

March 9th, 2010 2 comments

Several smart bloggers (Eric Sloof, Justin EmersonIan Koenig, Alessandro Perilli) discovered the VMware Labs web site over the weekend. As many pointed out, it’s absolutely cool.

I actually knew it was going to be online this past weekend, but would like to get official announcement from the company before blogging it. The reason I knew the site to go live is because the vSphere Java API I created is one of the first 10 projects.

Categories: vSphere API Tags:

VMwareExpress Truck: First Hand Experience

March 8th, 2010 No comments

VMwareExpress truck came to VMware headquarter before noon today, parking between the gym and office buildings. I went to check it out this afternoon, also enjoyed ice cream in front of the truck.

The following is a picture of the truck. I could use others, but think this one is better because it has the cloud as background. :-)

Categories: News & Events Tags:

Lightweight Caching Framework in vSphere Java API 2.0

March 7th, 2010 5 comments

In vSphere Java API 2.0, I wrote a lightweight caching framework. It’s still experimental but has a great potential to greatly simplify your development work. Commercial companies already use it in their products.

The motivation behind this framework is simple – instead of keep polling the changes from the server side, you keep a local cache that is made as fresh as possible. The View in the vSphere Perl toolkit is one way to do. It caches all properties of a managed object despite the fact that you don’t need that many at all.

The caching framework in vSphere Java API takes another approach. You tells it what managed objects and what properties you want to be cached. After that, the caching framework does its best to read the properties and keep them as fresh as possible.

Architecturally the caching framework is totally separated from the core of the API. You can take it away without any impact on the rest of the API. This is quite different from other toolkit.

Have enough introduction? Let’s take a look at sample code:

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

Who is Hyping Cloud Computing? You Will be Surprised!

March 7th, 2010 2 comments

I came across a blog “5 things VMware must do to fend off Microsoft.” The author Jon Brodkin listed the following musts: cut prices, improve Security, win the desktop war, simplify management, don’t overhype the cloud. Here is a response to the article by Steve Kaplan.

Because I am working on cloud related projects, especially I am the creator of the vSphere Java API that manages the “cloud operating system,” I am curious to know whether VMware is overhyping the cloud computing.

Instead of expressing my opinions, I decided to do a simple research using Google and Wikipedia. To my surprise, the “cloud computing” page does not include VMware in “Cloud computing logical diagram.” The companies listed are Microsoft, Google, Saleforce, Amazon, Yahoo, Rackspace, Zoho. Well, that is good for me to do the next step.

Then, I used Google to search each company’s name and “cloud computing.” I wasn’t testing the performance, but to see how many web pages are there including these keywords. Strictly speaking, the number of hits is not an index of hyping cloud computing, but you can get a good sense on how much marketing effort each company invest into “cloud computing.”

To save you time, I captured the screenshots of each search, and list the most important parts we are interested as follows.

Categories: Cloud Computing Tags:

2 Easy Steps to Add Source Code into Your Blog

March 6th, 2010 3 comments

WordPress is a great blogging software. I am very happy with it except that it does not have nice built-in support to include source code, which an absolutely needed feature for me.

Given the rich set of plug-ins WordPress has, I know there must be some plug-in there already. Today I spent a little time on research. After trying several plug-ins, I decided to use Google Syntax Highlighter for WordPress. You can check out how it looks like as follows.

Building Trusted Datacenters in the Cloud

March 6th, 2010 No comments

RSA just had its annual conference at San Francisco this past week. Intel, VMware and RSA demoed how to build up layers of trust in data centers in the conference.

Using vSphere Java API in Jython and Other JVM languages

March 5th, 2010 2 comments

As a by-product, the vSphere Java API makes Jython programming a lot easier. The following is a very simple sample written in Jython to print out the name of the first virtual machine in inventory.

    from java.net import *
    from com.vmware.vim25.mo import *

    si= ServiceInstance(URL(“https://sjin-dev1/sdk”),\
    “root”, “password”, True)
    rootFolder = si.getRootFolder()
    vms = InventoryNavigator(rootFolder) \
    .searchManagedEntities(“VirtualMachine”)
    print “Hello ” + vms[0].getName()
    si.getServerConnection().logout()

As you can see, it really brings in the benefit of VI Java API into Python community at almost no extra cost.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

5 Easy Steps Using vSphere Java API

March 4th, 2010 2 comments

In my previous blogs, I have introduced the vSphere API object model, vSphere Java API architecture. I assume you’ve run through the 5 minute Getting Started Tutorials with HelloWorld sample.

Now, let’s take a look on how to use the API in general.

1. Always starts with a ServiceInstance with URL/username/password, or URL/sessionID. For example,

ServiceInstance si = new ServiceInstance(new URL(urlStr), username, password, true);

2. From the ServiceInstance object, you can:

Categories: vSphere API Tags: ,

vSphere Java API Architecture Deep Dive

March 3rd, 2010 2 comments

In my previous blog, I talked about the object model of the vSphere API. Many people like the UML diagram that illustrates how the managed objects are inherited from each other.

Following that blog, I will introduce the object model of the open source Java API that is built on top of the Web Services, as well as some key design decisions I made while designing the API.

The following UML diagram is extracted from the overall model but adds much more details with properties and methods. If you can understand this diagram, you can then easily understand all other managed object types.

Trying Self Paced Lab without Going to PEX 2010

March 2nd, 2010 No comments

I mentioned the vSphere API self paced lab at PEX in my previous blog. Not all the people who are interested in learning the API made it to PEX last month. A reader asked me when it can be online in his comment.

Here is the VI Java API part in the tutorial. We had the environment set up all together for you in the PEX lab including the Eclipse and all the related jar files. So it’s very easy to get started there. Without going to PEX, you need to do something extra by yourself. But that is not too hard at all. I promise it won’t take you much time at all. To get the basic one done, you probably need 5 to 30 minutes depending on your familiarity with Java.

Ready to learn?

Two Books Every Top Software Architect Should Read

March 1st, 2010 No comments

When asked what books to read, I always recommend the following two books:

Are Your Lights On?: How to Figure Out What the Problem Really Is by Donald C. Gause; Gerald M. Weinberg

The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman

“But, they seem nothing to do with software!” You say.

You are right. But remember the blog title has a keyword “top.” If you want to stand out in any profession, some of the extra skills may well be outside your typical set as others expect.

The same is true for software profession. I assume you already know the basics of software programming, process, design patterns, etc., so another programming book doesn’t help you much to the top technically.

Let me explain why and how these two books help you.