Archive

Archive for February, 2010

Automatically Generate Your Java Code With Onyx?

February 6th, 2010 2 comments

During last Friday VMware beer bash, I bumped into Carter Shanklin. He told me he’s ready show off how his Onyx project can help Java developers using VI Java API at Partner Exchange next week in Las Vegas. If you will be there, be sure to attend his session TEXIBP1007 – also known as “Getting Stoned with ‘Project Onyx’” on Thursday at 11:30.

The Mythical Sessions in vSphere and VI

February 5th, 2010 7 comments

In my previous blogs, I talked about session management for scalability and best practices (#9). In this one, I am going to drill down to the bottom.

To your surprises, there are two types of sessions involved in vSphere SDK:

  • HTTP Session. It’s used to identify a client and tracked by the cookie in HTTP header. Once you login the server, all the successive requests have to carry the cookie header similar as follows

vmware_soap_session=”5229c547-1342-47d1-e830-223d99a47fba”

  • User Session. It’s used to identify a login session of a particular user. You can use SessionManager to find out more the details of the current user and other login users from the UserSession data object. The key in the UserSession is in the same format as the HTTP session, but you should never confuse them, or use them interchangeably.

4 Ways to WIN $2,500 Prize With vSphere Java API

February 4th, 2010 3 comments

You may have read blogs from my colleagues Mike DiPetrillo, Duncan Epping about the VMware Script-O-Mania contest. The prizes are $2,500 (1st), $1,000 (2nd), and $500(3rd) respectively. The contest ends in March 15, 2010. So act quickly!

“Wait, how can I WIN the prizes?”

Well, first of all, you want to read carefully the criteria. Note that your script is for System Administrators with ESXi. So it could be for initial server set up, health monitoring, trouble shooting, reporting auditing, or anything else that is cool and creative. I suggest you talk to system administrators what REAL PAINS they have, and how they would like to fix the problems.

When you are clear what problems to solve, then let’s move on.

If you are already familiar with PowerCLI and RCLI, you should probably stick with them. You can get helps from VMware Developer Community.

If not, open source VI Java API can help you!

Here are 4 ways the API can do for you to win the $2,500:

Introducing A Tiny Yet Powerful API to Manage and Automate vSphere

February 3rd, 2010 8 comments

In yesterday’s blog, I talked about a little known secret of vSphere MOB – the invisible embedded XML in the HTML pages. To take advantage of the secret, I created a client side REST API which was shipped in VI Java API 2.0.

A Little Known Secret of vSphere Managed Object Browser

February 2nd, 2010 6 comments

secretMost VI SDK developers know Managed Object Browser (MOB), and mostly have used it for better understanding of the SDK, or assisting programming and debugging. In my opinion, it’s a must-have  tool for every vSphere SDK developer.

It’s extremely helpful if you want to figure out the inventory path of certain managed entities. The vSphere Client shows you different paths which don’t work with the SearchIndex and others. Nothing wrong with vSphere Client – it just tries to display information in a way that is easier to understand by the system administrators.

Categories: vSphere API Tags: , , ,

CO2: The Formula For A Successful Developer Ecosystem

February 1st, 2010 No comments

Since joining VMware two and half years ago, I have been working like a consultant on partner enablement projects in various technical areas like SDK, SRM array adapter, VI Client plug-in, DRS clustering, etc. While working on these engagements, I always think about more efficient and more effective ways to get my work done and grow our developer ecosystem.

To summarize what I learned and thought, I decide to use CO2 as the success formula because it fits well when we talk about an ecosystem. The CO2 here means differently though. It represents Cash + Open source + Open communication.